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The Daily Dish: August 14, 2015

The Daily Dish: August 14, 2015

Welcome to The Daily Meal’s Daily Dish, where we highlight what’s hot and trending in the world of all things food and drink.

Today’s first course?

Dr Pepper Enlists Kobe Bryant, James Harden to Popularize Gatorade Rival

Dr Pepper Snapple Group is taking on Gatorade with its sports drink BodyArmor, and they’re hoping Lakers legend Kobe Bryant’s high profile will help. Bryant, an investor, joins pitchmen like Rockets’ shooting guard James Harden, Cavs’ power forward Kevin Love, and Seahawks’ cornerback Richard Sherman. The deal should gain BodyArmor wider distribution and help turn the sports drink into a national brand. According to The Wall Street Journal, sales from the last nine months have increased 180 percent since last year.

Did Someone Say Deep-Fried Bacon and Beer Ice Cream Sandwiches? Get the Recipe Here

Did someone say deep-fried bacon and beer ice cream sandwiches?! That’s the latest in the state fair food-inspired recipe category on Dude Foods, a blog geared to men with big appetites. They created this ultimate midnight snack on a whim, but now that this amazingness exists, you’re going to want to learn how to make it on The Daily Meal.

Not So Fast, Paleo Enthusiasts: Carbs Were on the Caveman Menu, Research Says

Fan of the Paleo diet? The low-carb and -dairy, high-protein and -vegetables diet supposedly mimics our ancestral eating habits, but new research says carbs were not only readily available in the Paleolithic era, but were essential to human brain growth. That’s right: Carbs could have made humanity smarter.

B&H Dairy Finally Reopening After Devastating East Village Explosion

In a heart-warming story, the gas explosion in New York’s East Village that destroyed the city’s best French fry spot (Pommes Frites) and the kosher dairy restaurant B&H, hasn’t knocked the institution out for good. After less than a month of crowdfunding, B&H Dairy says it will reopen Friday. As the restaurants’ T-shirts, say: Challah!

Finally, it looks like baseball legend "Charlie Hustle” is making it into the Hall of Fame…kind of. Major League Baseball hasn’t lifted its ban on the ineligible all-time hits leader for having gambled on baseball while managing the Reds, but Pete Rose will be inducted into Peter's Clam Bar’s own Hall of Fame in the Island Park, N.Y. restaurant where he’s hosting the annual Long Island Clam Eating Contest benefiting firehouses damaged by Hurricane Sandy.


Hungry for seafood gumbo? Here's a recipe that will feed you and a whole lot of your gumbo-loving friends: David's Daily Dish

Here is a great recipe for those rare occasions when you will be called up on to cook up a larger than normal pot of seafood gumbo. It's a great recipe for feeding a crowd of hungry gumbo-lovers. (Photo courtesy of Alabama Seafood)

For a lot of you this particular offering won't be of much use to you and your daily lives. But for some of you it will be very relevant and, I hope, most useful.

Making a pot of gumbo is an ordeal, one that takes a lot of time and effort and (not to mention) expense. It's a grand social experiment in which your friends, family and neighbors can reap the benefits of your hard work and you get all the credit.

But once word gets out that you are making the investment in time and money necessary to cook a pot of seafood gumbo all your friends and extended family finds an excuse to come and pay you a visit at dinnertime. And that's fine, because as we stated earlier part of the fun of cooking gumbo is the shared experience of having everybody join in the fun.

Making a small pot of gumbo takes a lot of work, that's for certain. It's a labor intensive effort that requires patience, a steady hand and a good sense of style and proportion to make a good pot of gumbo.

Not to mention the expense of buying that much fresh seafood that's a whole other story altogether.

There are, however, occasions when you will find yourself in need of a recipe that can feed a crowd of hungry gumbo fans. It doesn't happen often, but there are occasions when you will be asked to prepare enough gumbo for a horde and I'm here to report to you that small batch gumbo recipes don't often translate into big batch recipes.
Unlike other things, your normal small batch recipe doesn't translate well into a bigger pot. It's hard to figure out, first of all, how much roux to make and that is where things can go south in a hurry.

So, on those occasions when you do need to make a bunch of gumbo, here is a fine recipe from the good folks at Lap's Restaurant on the Causeway in Mobile. It is very much in line with the old-school, old Mobile fashion with lots of tomatoes and plenty of Gulf of Mexico seafood.


Hungry for seafood gumbo? Here's a recipe that will feed you and a whole lot of your gumbo-loving friends: David's Daily Dish

Here is a great recipe for those rare occasions when you will be called up on to cook up a larger than normal pot of seafood gumbo. It's a great recipe for feeding a crowd of hungry gumbo-lovers. (Photo courtesy of Alabama Seafood)

For a lot of you this particular offering won't be of much use to you and your daily lives. But for some of you it will be very relevant and, I hope, most useful.

Making a pot of gumbo is an ordeal, one that takes a lot of time and effort and (not to mention) expense. It's a grand social experiment in which your friends, family and neighbors can reap the benefits of your hard work and you get all the credit.

But once word gets out that you are making the investment in time and money necessary to cook a pot of seafood gumbo all your friends and extended family finds an excuse to come and pay you a visit at dinnertime. And that's fine, because as we stated earlier part of the fun of cooking gumbo is the shared experience of having everybody join in the fun.

Making a small pot of gumbo takes a lot of work, that's for certain. It's a labor intensive effort that requires patience, a steady hand and a good sense of style and proportion to make a good pot of gumbo.

Not to mention the expense of buying that much fresh seafood that's a whole other story altogether.

There are, however, occasions when you will find yourself in need of a recipe that can feed a crowd of hungry gumbo fans. It doesn't happen often, but there are occasions when you will be asked to prepare enough gumbo for a horde and I'm here to report to you that small batch gumbo recipes don't often translate into big batch recipes.
Unlike other things, your normal small batch recipe doesn't translate well into a bigger pot. It's hard to figure out, first of all, how much roux to make and that is where things can go south in a hurry.

So, on those occasions when you do need to make a bunch of gumbo, here is a fine recipe from the good folks at Lap's Restaurant on the Causeway in Mobile. It is very much in line with the old-school, old Mobile fashion with lots of tomatoes and plenty of Gulf of Mexico seafood.


Hungry for seafood gumbo? Here's a recipe that will feed you and a whole lot of your gumbo-loving friends: David's Daily Dish

Here is a great recipe for those rare occasions when you will be called up on to cook up a larger than normal pot of seafood gumbo. It's a great recipe for feeding a crowd of hungry gumbo-lovers. (Photo courtesy of Alabama Seafood)

For a lot of you this particular offering won't be of much use to you and your daily lives. But for some of you it will be very relevant and, I hope, most useful.

Making a pot of gumbo is an ordeal, one that takes a lot of time and effort and (not to mention) expense. It's a grand social experiment in which your friends, family and neighbors can reap the benefits of your hard work and you get all the credit.

But once word gets out that you are making the investment in time and money necessary to cook a pot of seafood gumbo all your friends and extended family finds an excuse to come and pay you a visit at dinnertime. And that's fine, because as we stated earlier part of the fun of cooking gumbo is the shared experience of having everybody join in the fun.

Making a small pot of gumbo takes a lot of work, that's for certain. It's a labor intensive effort that requires patience, a steady hand and a good sense of style and proportion to make a good pot of gumbo.

Not to mention the expense of buying that much fresh seafood that's a whole other story altogether.

There are, however, occasions when you will find yourself in need of a recipe that can feed a crowd of hungry gumbo fans. It doesn't happen often, but there are occasions when you will be asked to prepare enough gumbo for a horde and I'm here to report to you that small batch gumbo recipes don't often translate into big batch recipes.
Unlike other things, your normal small batch recipe doesn't translate well into a bigger pot. It's hard to figure out, first of all, how much roux to make and that is where things can go south in a hurry.

So, on those occasions when you do need to make a bunch of gumbo, here is a fine recipe from the good folks at Lap's Restaurant on the Causeway in Mobile. It is very much in line with the old-school, old Mobile fashion with lots of tomatoes and plenty of Gulf of Mexico seafood.


Hungry for seafood gumbo? Here's a recipe that will feed you and a whole lot of your gumbo-loving friends: David's Daily Dish

Here is a great recipe for those rare occasions when you will be called up on to cook up a larger than normal pot of seafood gumbo. It's a great recipe for feeding a crowd of hungry gumbo-lovers. (Photo courtesy of Alabama Seafood)

For a lot of you this particular offering won't be of much use to you and your daily lives. But for some of you it will be very relevant and, I hope, most useful.

Making a pot of gumbo is an ordeal, one that takes a lot of time and effort and (not to mention) expense. It's a grand social experiment in which your friends, family and neighbors can reap the benefits of your hard work and you get all the credit.

But once word gets out that you are making the investment in time and money necessary to cook a pot of seafood gumbo all your friends and extended family finds an excuse to come and pay you a visit at dinnertime. And that's fine, because as we stated earlier part of the fun of cooking gumbo is the shared experience of having everybody join in the fun.

Making a small pot of gumbo takes a lot of work, that's for certain. It's a labor intensive effort that requires patience, a steady hand and a good sense of style and proportion to make a good pot of gumbo.

Not to mention the expense of buying that much fresh seafood that's a whole other story altogether.

There are, however, occasions when you will find yourself in need of a recipe that can feed a crowd of hungry gumbo fans. It doesn't happen often, but there are occasions when you will be asked to prepare enough gumbo for a horde and I'm here to report to you that small batch gumbo recipes don't often translate into big batch recipes.
Unlike other things, your normal small batch recipe doesn't translate well into a bigger pot. It's hard to figure out, first of all, how much roux to make and that is where things can go south in a hurry.

So, on those occasions when you do need to make a bunch of gumbo, here is a fine recipe from the good folks at Lap's Restaurant on the Causeway in Mobile. It is very much in line with the old-school, old Mobile fashion with lots of tomatoes and plenty of Gulf of Mexico seafood.


Hungry for seafood gumbo? Here's a recipe that will feed you and a whole lot of your gumbo-loving friends: David's Daily Dish

Here is a great recipe for those rare occasions when you will be called up on to cook up a larger than normal pot of seafood gumbo. It's a great recipe for feeding a crowd of hungry gumbo-lovers. (Photo courtesy of Alabama Seafood)

For a lot of you this particular offering won't be of much use to you and your daily lives. But for some of you it will be very relevant and, I hope, most useful.

Making a pot of gumbo is an ordeal, one that takes a lot of time and effort and (not to mention) expense. It's a grand social experiment in which your friends, family and neighbors can reap the benefits of your hard work and you get all the credit.

But once word gets out that you are making the investment in time and money necessary to cook a pot of seafood gumbo all your friends and extended family finds an excuse to come and pay you a visit at dinnertime. And that's fine, because as we stated earlier part of the fun of cooking gumbo is the shared experience of having everybody join in the fun.

Making a small pot of gumbo takes a lot of work, that's for certain. It's a labor intensive effort that requires patience, a steady hand and a good sense of style and proportion to make a good pot of gumbo.

Not to mention the expense of buying that much fresh seafood that's a whole other story altogether.

There are, however, occasions when you will find yourself in need of a recipe that can feed a crowd of hungry gumbo fans. It doesn't happen often, but there are occasions when you will be asked to prepare enough gumbo for a horde and I'm here to report to you that small batch gumbo recipes don't often translate into big batch recipes.
Unlike other things, your normal small batch recipe doesn't translate well into a bigger pot. It's hard to figure out, first of all, how much roux to make and that is where things can go south in a hurry.

So, on those occasions when you do need to make a bunch of gumbo, here is a fine recipe from the good folks at Lap's Restaurant on the Causeway in Mobile. It is very much in line with the old-school, old Mobile fashion with lots of tomatoes and plenty of Gulf of Mexico seafood.


Hungry for seafood gumbo? Here's a recipe that will feed you and a whole lot of your gumbo-loving friends: David's Daily Dish

Here is a great recipe for those rare occasions when you will be called up on to cook up a larger than normal pot of seafood gumbo. It's a great recipe for feeding a crowd of hungry gumbo-lovers. (Photo courtesy of Alabama Seafood)

For a lot of you this particular offering won't be of much use to you and your daily lives. But for some of you it will be very relevant and, I hope, most useful.

Making a pot of gumbo is an ordeal, one that takes a lot of time and effort and (not to mention) expense. It's a grand social experiment in which your friends, family and neighbors can reap the benefits of your hard work and you get all the credit.

But once word gets out that you are making the investment in time and money necessary to cook a pot of seafood gumbo all your friends and extended family finds an excuse to come and pay you a visit at dinnertime. And that's fine, because as we stated earlier part of the fun of cooking gumbo is the shared experience of having everybody join in the fun.

Making a small pot of gumbo takes a lot of work, that's for certain. It's a labor intensive effort that requires patience, a steady hand and a good sense of style and proportion to make a good pot of gumbo.

Not to mention the expense of buying that much fresh seafood that's a whole other story altogether.

There are, however, occasions when you will find yourself in need of a recipe that can feed a crowd of hungry gumbo fans. It doesn't happen often, but there are occasions when you will be asked to prepare enough gumbo for a horde and I'm here to report to you that small batch gumbo recipes don't often translate into big batch recipes.
Unlike other things, your normal small batch recipe doesn't translate well into a bigger pot. It's hard to figure out, first of all, how much roux to make and that is where things can go south in a hurry.

So, on those occasions when you do need to make a bunch of gumbo, here is a fine recipe from the good folks at Lap's Restaurant on the Causeway in Mobile. It is very much in line with the old-school, old Mobile fashion with lots of tomatoes and plenty of Gulf of Mexico seafood.


Hungry for seafood gumbo? Here's a recipe that will feed you and a whole lot of your gumbo-loving friends: David's Daily Dish

Here is a great recipe for those rare occasions when you will be called up on to cook up a larger than normal pot of seafood gumbo. It's a great recipe for feeding a crowd of hungry gumbo-lovers. (Photo courtesy of Alabama Seafood)

For a lot of you this particular offering won't be of much use to you and your daily lives. But for some of you it will be very relevant and, I hope, most useful.

Making a pot of gumbo is an ordeal, one that takes a lot of time and effort and (not to mention) expense. It's a grand social experiment in which your friends, family and neighbors can reap the benefits of your hard work and you get all the credit.

But once word gets out that you are making the investment in time and money necessary to cook a pot of seafood gumbo all your friends and extended family finds an excuse to come and pay you a visit at dinnertime. And that's fine, because as we stated earlier part of the fun of cooking gumbo is the shared experience of having everybody join in the fun.

Making a small pot of gumbo takes a lot of work, that's for certain. It's a labor intensive effort that requires patience, a steady hand and a good sense of style and proportion to make a good pot of gumbo.

Not to mention the expense of buying that much fresh seafood that's a whole other story altogether.

There are, however, occasions when you will find yourself in need of a recipe that can feed a crowd of hungry gumbo fans. It doesn't happen often, but there are occasions when you will be asked to prepare enough gumbo for a horde and I'm here to report to you that small batch gumbo recipes don't often translate into big batch recipes.
Unlike other things, your normal small batch recipe doesn't translate well into a bigger pot. It's hard to figure out, first of all, how much roux to make and that is where things can go south in a hurry.

So, on those occasions when you do need to make a bunch of gumbo, here is a fine recipe from the good folks at Lap's Restaurant on the Causeway in Mobile. It is very much in line with the old-school, old Mobile fashion with lots of tomatoes and plenty of Gulf of Mexico seafood.


Hungry for seafood gumbo? Here's a recipe that will feed you and a whole lot of your gumbo-loving friends: David's Daily Dish

Here is a great recipe for those rare occasions when you will be called up on to cook up a larger than normal pot of seafood gumbo. It's a great recipe for feeding a crowd of hungry gumbo-lovers. (Photo courtesy of Alabama Seafood)

For a lot of you this particular offering won't be of much use to you and your daily lives. But for some of you it will be very relevant and, I hope, most useful.

Making a pot of gumbo is an ordeal, one that takes a lot of time and effort and (not to mention) expense. It's a grand social experiment in which your friends, family and neighbors can reap the benefits of your hard work and you get all the credit.

But once word gets out that you are making the investment in time and money necessary to cook a pot of seafood gumbo all your friends and extended family finds an excuse to come and pay you a visit at dinnertime. And that's fine, because as we stated earlier part of the fun of cooking gumbo is the shared experience of having everybody join in the fun.

Making a small pot of gumbo takes a lot of work, that's for certain. It's a labor intensive effort that requires patience, a steady hand and a good sense of style and proportion to make a good pot of gumbo.

Not to mention the expense of buying that much fresh seafood that's a whole other story altogether.

There are, however, occasions when you will find yourself in need of a recipe that can feed a crowd of hungry gumbo fans. It doesn't happen often, but there are occasions when you will be asked to prepare enough gumbo for a horde and I'm here to report to you that small batch gumbo recipes don't often translate into big batch recipes.
Unlike other things, your normal small batch recipe doesn't translate well into a bigger pot. It's hard to figure out, first of all, how much roux to make and that is where things can go south in a hurry.

So, on those occasions when you do need to make a bunch of gumbo, here is a fine recipe from the good folks at Lap's Restaurant on the Causeway in Mobile. It is very much in line with the old-school, old Mobile fashion with lots of tomatoes and plenty of Gulf of Mexico seafood.


Hungry for seafood gumbo? Here's a recipe that will feed you and a whole lot of your gumbo-loving friends: David's Daily Dish

Here is a great recipe for those rare occasions when you will be called up on to cook up a larger than normal pot of seafood gumbo. It's a great recipe for feeding a crowd of hungry gumbo-lovers. (Photo courtesy of Alabama Seafood)

For a lot of you this particular offering won't be of much use to you and your daily lives. But for some of you it will be very relevant and, I hope, most useful.

Making a pot of gumbo is an ordeal, one that takes a lot of time and effort and (not to mention) expense. It's a grand social experiment in which your friends, family and neighbors can reap the benefits of your hard work and you get all the credit.

But once word gets out that you are making the investment in time and money necessary to cook a pot of seafood gumbo all your friends and extended family finds an excuse to come and pay you a visit at dinnertime. And that's fine, because as we stated earlier part of the fun of cooking gumbo is the shared experience of having everybody join in the fun.

Making a small pot of gumbo takes a lot of work, that's for certain. It's a labor intensive effort that requires patience, a steady hand and a good sense of style and proportion to make a good pot of gumbo.

Not to mention the expense of buying that much fresh seafood that's a whole other story altogether.

There are, however, occasions when you will find yourself in need of a recipe that can feed a crowd of hungry gumbo fans. It doesn't happen often, but there are occasions when you will be asked to prepare enough gumbo for a horde and I'm here to report to you that small batch gumbo recipes don't often translate into big batch recipes.
Unlike other things, your normal small batch recipe doesn't translate well into a bigger pot. It's hard to figure out, first of all, how much roux to make and that is where things can go south in a hurry.

So, on those occasions when you do need to make a bunch of gumbo, here is a fine recipe from the good folks at Lap's Restaurant on the Causeway in Mobile. It is very much in line with the old-school, old Mobile fashion with lots of tomatoes and plenty of Gulf of Mexico seafood.


Hungry for seafood gumbo? Here's a recipe that will feed you and a whole lot of your gumbo-loving friends: David's Daily Dish

Here is a great recipe for those rare occasions when you will be called up on to cook up a larger than normal pot of seafood gumbo. It's a great recipe for feeding a crowd of hungry gumbo-lovers. (Photo courtesy of Alabama Seafood)

For a lot of you this particular offering won't be of much use to you and your daily lives. But for some of you it will be very relevant and, I hope, most useful.

Making a pot of gumbo is an ordeal, one that takes a lot of time and effort and (not to mention) expense. It's a grand social experiment in which your friends, family and neighbors can reap the benefits of your hard work and you get all the credit.

But once word gets out that you are making the investment in time and money necessary to cook a pot of seafood gumbo all your friends and extended family finds an excuse to come and pay you a visit at dinnertime. And that's fine, because as we stated earlier part of the fun of cooking gumbo is the shared experience of having everybody join in the fun.

Making a small pot of gumbo takes a lot of work, that's for certain. It's a labor intensive effort that requires patience, a steady hand and a good sense of style and proportion to make a good pot of gumbo.

Not to mention the expense of buying that much fresh seafood that's a whole other story altogether.

There are, however, occasions when you will find yourself in need of a recipe that can feed a crowd of hungry gumbo fans. It doesn't happen often, but there are occasions when you will be asked to prepare enough gumbo for a horde and I'm here to report to you that small batch gumbo recipes don't often translate into big batch recipes.
Unlike other things, your normal small batch recipe doesn't translate well into a bigger pot. It's hard to figure out, first of all, how much roux to make and that is where things can go south in a hurry.

So, on those occasions when you do need to make a bunch of gumbo, here is a fine recipe from the good folks at Lap's Restaurant on the Causeway in Mobile. It is very much in line with the old-school, old Mobile fashion with lots of tomatoes and plenty of Gulf of Mexico seafood.


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