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Bitter End Yacht Club’s Signature Cocktails

Bitter End Yacht Club’s Signature Cocktails

This Virgin Gorda destination names its drinks after the boats in the harbor. Or is it the other way around?

Welcome to a new travel series, where we focus on a hotel’s signature dish and/or cocktail. In the same way that cities and towns have local specialties to try, hotels develop signature items that guests shouldn’t miss — whether it’s a popular room service dish they’ve perfected, a cocktail named after the hotel’s longtime bartender, or a seasonal specialty that repeat guests always look forward to. These are the things that they love to serve, and that you’ll really consider going back for.

This week we are daydreaming about brightly colored cocktails by the water at the Bitter End Yacht Club in Virgin Gorda. They’ve adopted (perhaps even by accident) a great way of naming their most fun, icy cold, and delicious cocktails — after the boats that bounce around in the dock before them. Or actually, maybe it was the other way around. The resort’s owner Dana Hokin says, "I’m not sure which came first, the drinks or the boats..." It seems to have started in the early ‘80s, when "if someone sailed a certain boat that day, they often found themselves having that drink at the bar later!"

This tradition spawned now-classic drinks like the frozen "Lemon Crash," which is the name of the J-24 boat that Hokin and her father sailed for a father/daughter adventure before delivering it to the resort. The drink is made with Mount Gay rum, lime juice, two cut up lemons, simple syrup, and ice all blended together and, ideally, served seaside in a cold cup that says "Bitter End Yacht Club" on the side.


Signature Cocktail Recipes

Pour gin, lime and raspberry liqueur into a highball glass of ice. Stir gently. Top with Ginger Ale. For more “ginger” kick add a few dashes of cocktail bitters.

White Lady

She may look delicate, but she’s a strong woman. As seen on Pour at Four.

  • 2oz Gin
  • 1/2oz Orange Liqueur
  • 1/2oz Fresh Lemon Juice
  • 1 Fresh Egg White

Add all into shaker with ice. Shake until frothy. Strain into chilled coupe.

Stork Club Cooler

The New York City Stork Cllub was a hot spot for movie starts in the 40s. This one was a chief barman, Nathaniel Cook, favorite. As seen on Pour at Four

  • 2oz Gin
  • Juice of half an orange
  • 1 tsp Sugar
  • 1 Fresh Egg White (optional)

Shake well & Strain over a collins glass of shaved ice.

JockeyClub

Some say the Jockey Club was another name for a Manhattan during the late 1800s. But as many cocktails due, over time subtle changes can make all the difference. As seen on Pour at Four

  • 2oz Gin
  • .5oz Amaretto
  • 1 tsp Triple Sec
  • 1 dash bitters
  • .25oz Lemon Juice

Shake all and strain into lowball over crushed ice.

Singapore Sling

We First crafted at the Long Bar in the early 1900s, it’s one of the few “tiki” classes to use Gin, As seen on Pour at Four.

  • ¾ oz Gin
  • ¼ oz Grand Marnier
  • ¼ oz Cherry Liqueur
  • ¼ oz Herbal Liqueur (Benedictine/Big O)
  • 1 oz Pineapple Juice
  • ½ oz Lime Juice
  • 1 Dash Bitters
  • Club Soda

Add all but garnish and club into a shaker with ice. Shake well. Strain into a hurricane or highball glass and top with club soda. Garnish with cherry and orange.

Ramos Gin Fizz

Order this classic New Orleans cocktail and you’ll either be greated with delight or a smack on the face. Somewhere between a gin fizz and a milkshake, it takes many shakes (and people) to make this drink popular.

  • 2oz Gin
  • .5oz Heavy Cream
  • .5oz Fresh Lemon Juice
  • .5oz Fresh Lime Juice
  • 3/4oz Simple Syrup
  • 3 Dashes Orange Flower Water
  • 1 Fresh Egg White
  • Club Soda to Top

Add all but club soda into a shaker. Dry shake for 30 seconds. Add ice. Shake for 2 minutes or until cup is frosted. Strain into Collins over shaved ice. Pour a little bit of club back and forth between the empty halves of the shaker to pick up any residual. Pour over glass.

Pinckney Lady

We’ve updated the classic prohibition cocktail, The Pink Lady, by replacing the grenadine with our more flavorful tonic syrup. Slightly fruity with blossoming herbal notes, this blushing cocktail has been around a long time for a reason.

Shake all ingredients very well over ice. Straining into cocktail or martini glass. Egg white should have frothed to leave a thin head. Garnish with Cherry.

Aviation

The Aviation was created by Hugo Ensslin in New York in the early twentieth century. One of the lost cocktails of prohibition, the Aviation is making a return due to its bright and refreshing taste.

  • 2 oz Pinckney Bend Gin
  • .5 oz Maraschino liqueur
  • .25 oz Creme de violette or Creme Yvette
  • .75 oz Lemon Juice

Add all ingredients to a shaker and fill with ice. Shake and strain into martini glass.

Negroni

The most reported account of this drinks creation is from Florence, Italy in 1919. Count Camillo Negroni asked his barkeep to strengthen his favorite cocktail, the Americano, by adding gin instead of seltzer. No matter the origin, the Negroni is one of the world’s indispensable cocktails.

  • 1-1/2 oz Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 3/4 oz Campari
  • 3/4 oz Italian (Rosso) Vermouth
  • Orange Peel Garnish

Shake well with cracked ice. Strain into chilled collins glass and garnish with a twist of orange peel.

Gin Rickey

Invented in a DC bar called Shoemaker’s during an especially brutal heat wave in the 1890s, the gin rickey is one of summer’s great joys. Refreshingly bubbly and pleasantly bitter, this Gilded Age refridgerator demonstrates how people made it thru summers without air conditioning

Fill a highball glass with ice and add gin. Juice the lime halves into the glass and drop in the the lime shells as garnish. Fill with club soda.

Southside

According to one story, the drink was the favorite of Al Capone who dominated Chicago’s South side. The gin imported by his rivals on the North Side was smooth and usually consumed with ginger ale. Capone’s gin was rougher and required more sweetness to make it palatable.

  • 2 oz Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 10-12 Mint Leaves, muddled
  • 3/4 oz Simple syrup
  • 1 oz lemon juice

Muddle the mint into the bottom of a shakre. Add ice, gin, lemon juice and simple syrup into shaker. Shake vigorously. Strain into a chilled martini glass and garnish with mint.

French 75

The 75-millimeter M1897, a light, potent little gun with a vicious rate of fire, was the mainstay of the French field artillery in World War I. Hence the drink that was favored by the Lost Generation. Of all the many champagne-and-liquor combinations known to contemporary mixology, this one has the most élan.

  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 tsp superfine sugar
  • 1/4 oz. St. Germain
  • 1/2 oz lemon juice
  • 5oz Brut champagne
  • Lemon Rind for garnish

Shake well with cracked ice in a chilled shaker, then strain into a flute. Top with Champagne.

Gin Gin Mule

Pinckney Bend Accounts Manager Tara Steffens loves mules, but hates vodka. This is her take on a classic buck, with a Pinckney Bend Twist.

  • 1.5 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 oz. Simple Syrup
  • 1/4 oz. St. Germain
  • 3/4 oz. Lime Juice
  • 1 Dash Mint Bitters (optional)
  • 4 oz. Gosling’s Ginger Beer
  • Mint Spring or Lime Garnish

Fill rocks class with ice. Build all over and top with Ginger Beer. Stir and garnish.

Fallen Angel

After many mistakes, Accounts Manager Tara Steffens found the perfect citrus forward martini. Full gin flavor, with a citrus finish. This martini is sure no angel.

  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 oz. St. Germain’s
  • 1 oz. lime juice
  • 3/4 oz. lime juice
  • 3-5 dashes grapefruit bitters

Build in a shaker full of ice. Shake well until blended. Strain into martini glass. Garnish with orange wheel.

The Berlusconi

Pinckney Bend Apprentice Distiller Keith Meyer created his take on a dessert cocktail with an elegant flair, and named in honor of the hard-partying, billionaire ex-Prime Minister of Italy. This spirit-based float is unpredictable, so it’s a good thing it’s rich.

  • 1 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1/4 oz. Campari
  • 3/4 oz. Triple Sec
  • 1/2 oz. Sweet Vermouth
  • Club Soda
  • Orange Sorbet
  • Mint Spring Garnish

Combine Gin, Campari, Triple Sec and Vermouth in shaker full of ice. Strain into Martini glass. Add club soda, leaving a bit of room. Float sorbet into glass. Garnish with mint.

Bee’s Knees

A popular prohibition-era libation, and one of Senior Staff member Tara’s favorites, this cocktail was originally made with a honey syrup to mask the strong odor of prohibition gin. Here we offer both a classic style and our modern twist with a honey liquor to enhance the flavors of our American style gin. It’s the very best, the cat’s pajamas, the eel’s hips and it hits on all sixes. That enough Prohibition slang for ya?

Classic Bee’s Knees
  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 3/4 oz. fresh lemon juice
  • 3/4 oz. Honey Syrup ( use equal parts honey and warm water)

Shake with ice, serve in a rocks glass with a slice of lemon

Modern Bee’s Knees
  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 oz. Barenjager
  • 1/2 oz. lemon juice
  • Lemon Peel or Honeycomb garnish

Combine all in shaker until frothy. Fill a rocks glass to the brim with shaved ice. Pour over and let rest. Garnish with peel or honeycomb.


Signature Cocktail Recipes

Pour gin, lime and raspberry liqueur into a highball glass of ice. Stir gently. Top with Ginger Ale. For more “ginger” kick add a few dashes of cocktail bitters.

White Lady

She may look delicate, but she’s a strong woman. As seen on Pour at Four.

  • 2oz Gin
  • 1/2oz Orange Liqueur
  • 1/2oz Fresh Lemon Juice
  • 1 Fresh Egg White

Add all into shaker with ice. Shake until frothy. Strain into chilled coupe.

Stork Club Cooler

The New York City Stork Cllub was a hot spot for movie starts in the 40s. This one was a chief barman, Nathaniel Cook, favorite. As seen on Pour at Four

  • 2oz Gin
  • Juice of half an orange
  • 1 tsp Sugar
  • 1 Fresh Egg White (optional)

Shake well & Strain over a collins glass of shaved ice.

JockeyClub

Some say the Jockey Club was another name for a Manhattan during the late 1800s. But as many cocktails due, over time subtle changes can make all the difference. As seen on Pour at Four

  • 2oz Gin
  • .5oz Amaretto
  • 1 tsp Triple Sec
  • 1 dash bitters
  • .25oz Lemon Juice

Shake all and strain into lowball over crushed ice.

Singapore Sling

We First crafted at the Long Bar in the early 1900s, it’s one of the few “tiki” classes to use Gin, As seen on Pour at Four.

  • ¾ oz Gin
  • ¼ oz Grand Marnier
  • ¼ oz Cherry Liqueur
  • ¼ oz Herbal Liqueur (Benedictine/Big O)
  • 1 oz Pineapple Juice
  • ½ oz Lime Juice
  • 1 Dash Bitters
  • Club Soda

Add all but garnish and club into a shaker with ice. Shake well. Strain into a hurricane or highball glass and top with club soda. Garnish with cherry and orange.

Ramos Gin Fizz

Order this classic New Orleans cocktail and you’ll either be greated with delight or a smack on the face. Somewhere between a gin fizz and a milkshake, it takes many shakes (and people) to make this drink popular.

  • 2oz Gin
  • .5oz Heavy Cream
  • .5oz Fresh Lemon Juice
  • .5oz Fresh Lime Juice
  • 3/4oz Simple Syrup
  • 3 Dashes Orange Flower Water
  • 1 Fresh Egg White
  • Club Soda to Top

Add all but club soda into a shaker. Dry shake for 30 seconds. Add ice. Shake for 2 minutes or until cup is frosted. Strain into Collins over shaved ice. Pour a little bit of club back and forth between the empty halves of the shaker to pick up any residual. Pour over glass.

Pinckney Lady

We’ve updated the classic prohibition cocktail, The Pink Lady, by replacing the grenadine with our more flavorful tonic syrup. Slightly fruity with blossoming herbal notes, this blushing cocktail has been around a long time for a reason.

Shake all ingredients very well over ice. Straining into cocktail or martini glass. Egg white should have frothed to leave a thin head. Garnish with Cherry.

Aviation

The Aviation was created by Hugo Ensslin in New York in the early twentieth century. One of the lost cocktails of prohibition, the Aviation is making a return due to its bright and refreshing taste.

  • 2 oz Pinckney Bend Gin
  • .5 oz Maraschino liqueur
  • .25 oz Creme de violette or Creme Yvette
  • .75 oz Lemon Juice

Add all ingredients to a shaker and fill with ice. Shake and strain into martini glass.

Negroni

The most reported account of this drinks creation is from Florence, Italy in 1919. Count Camillo Negroni asked his barkeep to strengthen his favorite cocktail, the Americano, by adding gin instead of seltzer. No matter the origin, the Negroni is one of the world’s indispensable cocktails.

  • 1-1/2 oz Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 3/4 oz Campari
  • 3/4 oz Italian (Rosso) Vermouth
  • Orange Peel Garnish

Shake well with cracked ice. Strain into chilled collins glass and garnish with a twist of orange peel.

Gin Rickey

Invented in a DC bar called Shoemaker’s during an especially brutal heat wave in the 1890s, the gin rickey is one of summer’s great joys. Refreshingly bubbly and pleasantly bitter, this Gilded Age refridgerator demonstrates how people made it thru summers without air conditioning

Fill a highball glass with ice and add gin. Juice the lime halves into the glass and drop in the the lime shells as garnish. Fill with club soda.

Southside

According to one story, the drink was the favorite of Al Capone who dominated Chicago’s South side. The gin imported by his rivals on the North Side was smooth and usually consumed with ginger ale. Capone’s gin was rougher and required more sweetness to make it palatable.

  • 2 oz Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 10-12 Mint Leaves, muddled
  • 3/4 oz Simple syrup
  • 1 oz lemon juice

Muddle the mint into the bottom of a shakre. Add ice, gin, lemon juice and simple syrup into shaker. Shake vigorously. Strain into a chilled martini glass and garnish with mint.

French 75

The 75-millimeter M1897, a light, potent little gun with a vicious rate of fire, was the mainstay of the French field artillery in World War I. Hence the drink that was favored by the Lost Generation. Of all the many champagne-and-liquor combinations known to contemporary mixology, this one has the most élan.

  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 tsp superfine sugar
  • 1/4 oz. St. Germain
  • 1/2 oz lemon juice
  • 5oz Brut champagne
  • Lemon Rind for garnish

Shake well with cracked ice in a chilled shaker, then strain into a flute. Top with Champagne.

Gin Gin Mule

Pinckney Bend Accounts Manager Tara Steffens loves mules, but hates vodka. This is her take on a classic buck, with a Pinckney Bend Twist.

  • 1.5 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 oz. Simple Syrup
  • 1/4 oz. St. Germain
  • 3/4 oz. Lime Juice
  • 1 Dash Mint Bitters (optional)
  • 4 oz. Gosling’s Ginger Beer
  • Mint Spring or Lime Garnish

Fill rocks class with ice. Build all over and top with Ginger Beer. Stir and garnish.

Fallen Angel

After many mistakes, Accounts Manager Tara Steffens found the perfect citrus forward martini. Full gin flavor, with a citrus finish. This martini is sure no angel.

  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 oz. St. Germain’s
  • 1 oz. lime juice
  • 3/4 oz. lime juice
  • 3-5 dashes grapefruit bitters

Build in a shaker full of ice. Shake well until blended. Strain into martini glass. Garnish with orange wheel.

The Berlusconi

Pinckney Bend Apprentice Distiller Keith Meyer created his take on a dessert cocktail with an elegant flair, and named in honor of the hard-partying, billionaire ex-Prime Minister of Italy. This spirit-based float is unpredictable, so it’s a good thing it’s rich.

  • 1 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1/4 oz. Campari
  • 3/4 oz. Triple Sec
  • 1/2 oz. Sweet Vermouth
  • Club Soda
  • Orange Sorbet
  • Mint Spring Garnish

Combine Gin, Campari, Triple Sec and Vermouth in shaker full of ice. Strain into Martini glass. Add club soda, leaving a bit of room. Float sorbet into glass. Garnish with mint.

Bee’s Knees

A popular prohibition-era libation, and one of Senior Staff member Tara’s favorites, this cocktail was originally made with a honey syrup to mask the strong odor of prohibition gin. Here we offer both a classic style and our modern twist with a honey liquor to enhance the flavors of our American style gin. It’s the very best, the cat’s pajamas, the eel’s hips and it hits on all sixes. That enough Prohibition slang for ya?

Classic Bee’s Knees
  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 3/4 oz. fresh lemon juice
  • 3/4 oz. Honey Syrup ( use equal parts honey and warm water)

Shake with ice, serve in a rocks glass with a slice of lemon

Modern Bee’s Knees
  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 oz. Barenjager
  • 1/2 oz. lemon juice
  • Lemon Peel or Honeycomb garnish

Combine all in shaker until frothy. Fill a rocks glass to the brim with shaved ice. Pour over and let rest. Garnish with peel or honeycomb.


Signature Cocktail Recipes

Pour gin, lime and raspberry liqueur into a highball glass of ice. Stir gently. Top with Ginger Ale. For more “ginger” kick add a few dashes of cocktail bitters.

White Lady

She may look delicate, but she’s a strong woman. As seen on Pour at Four.

  • 2oz Gin
  • 1/2oz Orange Liqueur
  • 1/2oz Fresh Lemon Juice
  • 1 Fresh Egg White

Add all into shaker with ice. Shake until frothy. Strain into chilled coupe.

Stork Club Cooler

The New York City Stork Cllub was a hot spot for movie starts in the 40s. This one was a chief barman, Nathaniel Cook, favorite. As seen on Pour at Four

  • 2oz Gin
  • Juice of half an orange
  • 1 tsp Sugar
  • 1 Fresh Egg White (optional)

Shake well & Strain over a collins glass of shaved ice.

JockeyClub

Some say the Jockey Club was another name for a Manhattan during the late 1800s. But as many cocktails due, over time subtle changes can make all the difference. As seen on Pour at Four

  • 2oz Gin
  • .5oz Amaretto
  • 1 tsp Triple Sec
  • 1 dash bitters
  • .25oz Lemon Juice

Shake all and strain into lowball over crushed ice.

Singapore Sling

We First crafted at the Long Bar in the early 1900s, it’s one of the few “tiki” classes to use Gin, As seen on Pour at Four.

  • ¾ oz Gin
  • ¼ oz Grand Marnier
  • ¼ oz Cherry Liqueur
  • ¼ oz Herbal Liqueur (Benedictine/Big O)
  • 1 oz Pineapple Juice
  • ½ oz Lime Juice
  • 1 Dash Bitters
  • Club Soda

Add all but garnish and club into a shaker with ice. Shake well. Strain into a hurricane or highball glass and top with club soda. Garnish with cherry and orange.

Ramos Gin Fizz

Order this classic New Orleans cocktail and you’ll either be greated with delight or a smack on the face. Somewhere between a gin fizz and a milkshake, it takes many shakes (and people) to make this drink popular.

  • 2oz Gin
  • .5oz Heavy Cream
  • .5oz Fresh Lemon Juice
  • .5oz Fresh Lime Juice
  • 3/4oz Simple Syrup
  • 3 Dashes Orange Flower Water
  • 1 Fresh Egg White
  • Club Soda to Top

Add all but club soda into a shaker. Dry shake for 30 seconds. Add ice. Shake for 2 minutes or until cup is frosted. Strain into Collins over shaved ice. Pour a little bit of club back and forth between the empty halves of the shaker to pick up any residual. Pour over glass.

Pinckney Lady

We’ve updated the classic prohibition cocktail, The Pink Lady, by replacing the grenadine with our more flavorful tonic syrup. Slightly fruity with blossoming herbal notes, this blushing cocktail has been around a long time for a reason.

Shake all ingredients very well over ice. Straining into cocktail or martini glass. Egg white should have frothed to leave a thin head. Garnish with Cherry.

Aviation

The Aviation was created by Hugo Ensslin in New York in the early twentieth century. One of the lost cocktails of prohibition, the Aviation is making a return due to its bright and refreshing taste.

  • 2 oz Pinckney Bend Gin
  • .5 oz Maraschino liqueur
  • .25 oz Creme de violette or Creme Yvette
  • .75 oz Lemon Juice

Add all ingredients to a shaker and fill with ice. Shake and strain into martini glass.

Negroni

The most reported account of this drinks creation is from Florence, Italy in 1919. Count Camillo Negroni asked his barkeep to strengthen his favorite cocktail, the Americano, by adding gin instead of seltzer. No matter the origin, the Negroni is one of the world’s indispensable cocktails.

  • 1-1/2 oz Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 3/4 oz Campari
  • 3/4 oz Italian (Rosso) Vermouth
  • Orange Peel Garnish

Shake well with cracked ice. Strain into chilled collins glass and garnish with a twist of orange peel.

Gin Rickey

Invented in a DC bar called Shoemaker’s during an especially brutal heat wave in the 1890s, the gin rickey is one of summer’s great joys. Refreshingly bubbly and pleasantly bitter, this Gilded Age refridgerator demonstrates how people made it thru summers without air conditioning

Fill a highball glass with ice and add gin. Juice the lime halves into the glass and drop in the the lime shells as garnish. Fill with club soda.

Southside

According to one story, the drink was the favorite of Al Capone who dominated Chicago’s South side. The gin imported by his rivals on the North Side was smooth and usually consumed with ginger ale. Capone’s gin was rougher and required more sweetness to make it palatable.

  • 2 oz Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 10-12 Mint Leaves, muddled
  • 3/4 oz Simple syrup
  • 1 oz lemon juice

Muddle the mint into the bottom of a shakre. Add ice, gin, lemon juice and simple syrup into shaker. Shake vigorously. Strain into a chilled martini glass and garnish with mint.

French 75

The 75-millimeter M1897, a light, potent little gun with a vicious rate of fire, was the mainstay of the French field artillery in World War I. Hence the drink that was favored by the Lost Generation. Of all the many champagne-and-liquor combinations known to contemporary mixology, this one has the most élan.

  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 tsp superfine sugar
  • 1/4 oz. St. Germain
  • 1/2 oz lemon juice
  • 5oz Brut champagne
  • Lemon Rind for garnish

Shake well with cracked ice in a chilled shaker, then strain into a flute. Top with Champagne.

Gin Gin Mule

Pinckney Bend Accounts Manager Tara Steffens loves mules, but hates vodka. This is her take on a classic buck, with a Pinckney Bend Twist.

  • 1.5 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 oz. Simple Syrup
  • 1/4 oz. St. Germain
  • 3/4 oz. Lime Juice
  • 1 Dash Mint Bitters (optional)
  • 4 oz. Gosling’s Ginger Beer
  • Mint Spring or Lime Garnish

Fill rocks class with ice. Build all over and top with Ginger Beer. Stir and garnish.

Fallen Angel

After many mistakes, Accounts Manager Tara Steffens found the perfect citrus forward martini. Full gin flavor, with a citrus finish. This martini is sure no angel.

  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 oz. St. Germain’s
  • 1 oz. lime juice
  • 3/4 oz. lime juice
  • 3-5 dashes grapefruit bitters

Build in a shaker full of ice. Shake well until blended. Strain into martini glass. Garnish with orange wheel.

The Berlusconi

Pinckney Bend Apprentice Distiller Keith Meyer created his take on a dessert cocktail with an elegant flair, and named in honor of the hard-partying, billionaire ex-Prime Minister of Italy. This spirit-based float is unpredictable, so it’s a good thing it’s rich.

  • 1 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1/4 oz. Campari
  • 3/4 oz. Triple Sec
  • 1/2 oz. Sweet Vermouth
  • Club Soda
  • Orange Sorbet
  • Mint Spring Garnish

Combine Gin, Campari, Triple Sec and Vermouth in shaker full of ice. Strain into Martini glass. Add club soda, leaving a bit of room. Float sorbet into glass. Garnish with mint.

Bee’s Knees

A popular prohibition-era libation, and one of Senior Staff member Tara’s favorites, this cocktail was originally made with a honey syrup to mask the strong odor of prohibition gin. Here we offer both a classic style and our modern twist with a honey liquor to enhance the flavors of our American style gin. It’s the very best, the cat’s pajamas, the eel’s hips and it hits on all sixes. That enough Prohibition slang for ya?

Classic Bee’s Knees
  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 3/4 oz. fresh lemon juice
  • 3/4 oz. Honey Syrup ( use equal parts honey and warm water)

Shake with ice, serve in a rocks glass with a slice of lemon

Modern Bee’s Knees
  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 oz. Barenjager
  • 1/2 oz. lemon juice
  • Lemon Peel or Honeycomb garnish

Combine all in shaker until frothy. Fill a rocks glass to the brim with shaved ice. Pour over and let rest. Garnish with peel or honeycomb.


Signature Cocktail Recipes

Pour gin, lime and raspberry liqueur into a highball glass of ice. Stir gently. Top with Ginger Ale. For more “ginger” kick add a few dashes of cocktail bitters.

White Lady

She may look delicate, but she’s a strong woman. As seen on Pour at Four.

  • 2oz Gin
  • 1/2oz Orange Liqueur
  • 1/2oz Fresh Lemon Juice
  • 1 Fresh Egg White

Add all into shaker with ice. Shake until frothy. Strain into chilled coupe.

Stork Club Cooler

The New York City Stork Cllub was a hot spot for movie starts in the 40s. This one was a chief barman, Nathaniel Cook, favorite. As seen on Pour at Four

  • 2oz Gin
  • Juice of half an orange
  • 1 tsp Sugar
  • 1 Fresh Egg White (optional)

Shake well & Strain over a collins glass of shaved ice.

JockeyClub

Some say the Jockey Club was another name for a Manhattan during the late 1800s. But as many cocktails due, over time subtle changes can make all the difference. As seen on Pour at Four

  • 2oz Gin
  • .5oz Amaretto
  • 1 tsp Triple Sec
  • 1 dash bitters
  • .25oz Lemon Juice

Shake all and strain into lowball over crushed ice.

Singapore Sling

We First crafted at the Long Bar in the early 1900s, it’s one of the few “tiki” classes to use Gin, As seen on Pour at Four.

  • ¾ oz Gin
  • ¼ oz Grand Marnier
  • ¼ oz Cherry Liqueur
  • ¼ oz Herbal Liqueur (Benedictine/Big O)
  • 1 oz Pineapple Juice
  • ½ oz Lime Juice
  • 1 Dash Bitters
  • Club Soda

Add all but garnish and club into a shaker with ice. Shake well. Strain into a hurricane or highball glass and top with club soda. Garnish with cherry and orange.

Ramos Gin Fizz

Order this classic New Orleans cocktail and you’ll either be greated with delight or a smack on the face. Somewhere between a gin fizz and a milkshake, it takes many shakes (and people) to make this drink popular.

  • 2oz Gin
  • .5oz Heavy Cream
  • .5oz Fresh Lemon Juice
  • .5oz Fresh Lime Juice
  • 3/4oz Simple Syrup
  • 3 Dashes Orange Flower Water
  • 1 Fresh Egg White
  • Club Soda to Top

Add all but club soda into a shaker. Dry shake for 30 seconds. Add ice. Shake for 2 minutes or until cup is frosted. Strain into Collins over shaved ice. Pour a little bit of club back and forth between the empty halves of the shaker to pick up any residual. Pour over glass.

Pinckney Lady

We’ve updated the classic prohibition cocktail, The Pink Lady, by replacing the grenadine with our more flavorful tonic syrup. Slightly fruity with blossoming herbal notes, this blushing cocktail has been around a long time for a reason.

Shake all ingredients very well over ice. Straining into cocktail or martini glass. Egg white should have frothed to leave a thin head. Garnish with Cherry.

Aviation

The Aviation was created by Hugo Ensslin in New York in the early twentieth century. One of the lost cocktails of prohibition, the Aviation is making a return due to its bright and refreshing taste.

  • 2 oz Pinckney Bend Gin
  • .5 oz Maraschino liqueur
  • .25 oz Creme de violette or Creme Yvette
  • .75 oz Lemon Juice

Add all ingredients to a shaker and fill with ice. Shake and strain into martini glass.

Negroni

The most reported account of this drinks creation is from Florence, Italy in 1919. Count Camillo Negroni asked his barkeep to strengthen his favorite cocktail, the Americano, by adding gin instead of seltzer. No matter the origin, the Negroni is one of the world’s indispensable cocktails.

  • 1-1/2 oz Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 3/4 oz Campari
  • 3/4 oz Italian (Rosso) Vermouth
  • Orange Peel Garnish

Shake well with cracked ice. Strain into chilled collins glass and garnish with a twist of orange peel.

Gin Rickey

Invented in a DC bar called Shoemaker’s during an especially brutal heat wave in the 1890s, the gin rickey is one of summer’s great joys. Refreshingly bubbly and pleasantly bitter, this Gilded Age refridgerator demonstrates how people made it thru summers without air conditioning

Fill a highball glass with ice and add gin. Juice the lime halves into the glass and drop in the the lime shells as garnish. Fill with club soda.

Southside

According to one story, the drink was the favorite of Al Capone who dominated Chicago’s South side. The gin imported by his rivals on the North Side was smooth and usually consumed with ginger ale. Capone’s gin was rougher and required more sweetness to make it palatable.

  • 2 oz Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 10-12 Mint Leaves, muddled
  • 3/4 oz Simple syrup
  • 1 oz lemon juice

Muddle the mint into the bottom of a shakre. Add ice, gin, lemon juice and simple syrup into shaker. Shake vigorously. Strain into a chilled martini glass and garnish with mint.

French 75

The 75-millimeter M1897, a light, potent little gun with a vicious rate of fire, was the mainstay of the French field artillery in World War I. Hence the drink that was favored by the Lost Generation. Of all the many champagne-and-liquor combinations known to contemporary mixology, this one has the most élan.

  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 tsp superfine sugar
  • 1/4 oz. St. Germain
  • 1/2 oz lemon juice
  • 5oz Brut champagne
  • Lemon Rind for garnish

Shake well with cracked ice in a chilled shaker, then strain into a flute. Top with Champagne.

Gin Gin Mule

Pinckney Bend Accounts Manager Tara Steffens loves mules, but hates vodka. This is her take on a classic buck, with a Pinckney Bend Twist.

  • 1.5 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 oz. Simple Syrup
  • 1/4 oz. St. Germain
  • 3/4 oz. Lime Juice
  • 1 Dash Mint Bitters (optional)
  • 4 oz. Gosling’s Ginger Beer
  • Mint Spring or Lime Garnish

Fill rocks class with ice. Build all over and top with Ginger Beer. Stir and garnish.

Fallen Angel

After many mistakes, Accounts Manager Tara Steffens found the perfect citrus forward martini. Full gin flavor, with a citrus finish. This martini is sure no angel.

  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 oz. St. Germain’s
  • 1 oz. lime juice
  • 3/4 oz. lime juice
  • 3-5 dashes grapefruit bitters

Build in a shaker full of ice. Shake well until blended. Strain into martini glass. Garnish with orange wheel.

The Berlusconi

Pinckney Bend Apprentice Distiller Keith Meyer created his take on a dessert cocktail with an elegant flair, and named in honor of the hard-partying, billionaire ex-Prime Minister of Italy. This spirit-based float is unpredictable, so it’s a good thing it’s rich.

  • 1 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1/4 oz. Campari
  • 3/4 oz. Triple Sec
  • 1/2 oz. Sweet Vermouth
  • Club Soda
  • Orange Sorbet
  • Mint Spring Garnish

Combine Gin, Campari, Triple Sec and Vermouth in shaker full of ice. Strain into Martini glass. Add club soda, leaving a bit of room. Float sorbet into glass. Garnish with mint.

Bee’s Knees

A popular prohibition-era libation, and one of Senior Staff member Tara’s favorites, this cocktail was originally made with a honey syrup to mask the strong odor of prohibition gin. Here we offer both a classic style and our modern twist with a honey liquor to enhance the flavors of our American style gin. It’s the very best, the cat’s pajamas, the eel’s hips and it hits on all sixes. That enough Prohibition slang for ya?

Classic Bee’s Knees
  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 3/4 oz. fresh lemon juice
  • 3/4 oz. Honey Syrup ( use equal parts honey and warm water)

Shake with ice, serve in a rocks glass with a slice of lemon

Modern Bee’s Knees
  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 oz. Barenjager
  • 1/2 oz. lemon juice
  • Lemon Peel or Honeycomb garnish

Combine all in shaker until frothy. Fill a rocks glass to the brim with shaved ice. Pour over and let rest. Garnish with peel or honeycomb.


Signature Cocktail Recipes

Pour gin, lime and raspberry liqueur into a highball glass of ice. Stir gently. Top with Ginger Ale. For more “ginger” kick add a few dashes of cocktail bitters.

White Lady

She may look delicate, but she’s a strong woman. As seen on Pour at Four.

  • 2oz Gin
  • 1/2oz Orange Liqueur
  • 1/2oz Fresh Lemon Juice
  • 1 Fresh Egg White

Add all into shaker with ice. Shake until frothy. Strain into chilled coupe.

Stork Club Cooler

The New York City Stork Cllub was a hot spot for movie starts in the 40s. This one was a chief barman, Nathaniel Cook, favorite. As seen on Pour at Four

  • 2oz Gin
  • Juice of half an orange
  • 1 tsp Sugar
  • 1 Fresh Egg White (optional)

Shake well & Strain over a collins glass of shaved ice.

JockeyClub

Some say the Jockey Club was another name for a Manhattan during the late 1800s. But as many cocktails due, over time subtle changes can make all the difference. As seen on Pour at Four

  • 2oz Gin
  • .5oz Amaretto
  • 1 tsp Triple Sec
  • 1 dash bitters
  • .25oz Lemon Juice

Shake all and strain into lowball over crushed ice.

Singapore Sling

We First crafted at the Long Bar in the early 1900s, it’s one of the few “tiki” classes to use Gin, As seen on Pour at Four.

  • ¾ oz Gin
  • ¼ oz Grand Marnier
  • ¼ oz Cherry Liqueur
  • ¼ oz Herbal Liqueur (Benedictine/Big O)
  • 1 oz Pineapple Juice
  • ½ oz Lime Juice
  • 1 Dash Bitters
  • Club Soda

Add all but garnish and club into a shaker with ice. Shake well. Strain into a hurricane or highball glass and top with club soda. Garnish with cherry and orange.

Ramos Gin Fizz

Order this classic New Orleans cocktail and you’ll either be greated with delight or a smack on the face. Somewhere between a gin fizz and a milkshake, it takes many shakes (and people) to make this drink popular.

  • 2oz Gin
  • .5oz Heavy Cream
  • .5oz Fresh Lemon Juice
  • .5oz Fresh Lime Juice
  • 3/4oz Simple Syrup
  • 3 Dashes Orange Flower Water
  • 1 Fresh Egg White
  • Club Soda to Top

Add all but club soda into a shaker. Dry shake for 30 seconds. Add ice. Shake for 2 minutes or until cup is frosted. Strain into Collins over shaved ice. Pour a little bit of club back and forth between the empty halves of the shaker to pick up any residual. Pour over glass.

Pinckney Lady

We’ve updated the classic prohibition cocktail, The Pink Lady, by replacing the grenadine with our more flavorful tonic syrup. Slightly fruity with blossoming herbal notes, this blushing cocktail has been around a long time for a reason.

Shake all ingredients very well over ice. Straining into cocktail or martini glass. Egg white should have frothed to leave a thin head. Garnish with Cherry.

Aviation

The Aviation was created by Hugo Ensslin in New York in the early twentieth century. One of the lost cocktails of prohibition, the Aviation is making a return due to its bright and refreshing taste.

  • 2 oz Pinckney Bend Gin
  • .5 oz Maraschino liqueur
  • .25 oz Creme de violette or Creme Yvette
  • .75 oz Lemon Juice

Add all ingredients to a shaker and fill with ice. Shake and strain into martini glass.

Negroni

The most reported account of this drinks creation is from Florence, Italy in 1919. Count Camillo Negroni asked his barkeep to strengthen his favorite cocktail, the Americano, by adding gin instead of seltzer. No matter the origin, the Negroni is one of the world’s indispensable cocktails.

  • 1-1/2 oz Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 3/4 oz Campari
  • 3/4 oz Italian (Rosso) Vermouth
  • Orange Peel Garnish

Shake well with cracked ice. Strain into chilled collins glass and garnish with a twist of orange peel.

Gin Rickey

Invented in a DC bar called Shoemaker’s during an especially brutal heat wave in the 1890s, the gin rickey is one of summer’s great joys. Refreshingly bubbly and pleasantly bitter, this Gilded Age refridgerator demonstrates how people made it thru summers without air conditioning

Fill a highball glass with ice and add gin. Juice the lime halves into the glass and drop in the the lime shells as garnish. Fill with club soda.

Southside

According to one story, the drink was the favorite of Al Capone who dominated Chicago’s South side. The gin imported by his rivals on the North Side was smooth and usually consumed with ginger ale. Capone’s gin was rougher and required more sweetness to make it palatable.

  • 2 oz Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 10-12 Mint Leaves, muddled
  • 3/4 oz Simple syrup
  • 1 oz lemon juice

Muddle the mint into the bottom of a shakre. Add ice, gin, lemon juice and simple syrup into shaker. Shake vigorously. Strain into a chilled martini glass and garnish with mint.

French 75

The 75-millimeter M1897, a light, potent little gun with a vicious rate of fire, was the mainstay of the French field artillery in World War I. Hence the drink that was favored by the Lost Generation. Of all the many champagne-and-liquor combinations known to contemporary mixology, this one has the most élan.

  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 tsp superfine sugar
  • 1/4 oz. St. Germain
  • 1/2 oz lemon juice
  • 5oz Brut champagne
  • Lemon Rind for garnish

Shake well with cracked ice in a chilled shaker, then strain into a flute. Top with Champagne.

Gin Gin Mule

Pinckney Bend Accounts Manager Tara Steffens loves mules, but hates vodka. This is her take on a classic buck, with a Pinckney Bend Twist.

  • 1.5 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 oz. Simple Syrup
  • 1/4 oz. St. Germain
  • 3/4 oz. Lime Juice
  • 1 Dash Mint Bitters (optional)
  • 4 oz. Gosling’s Ginger Beer
  • Mint Spring or Lime Garnish

Fill rocks class with ice. Build all over and top with Ginger Beer. Stir and garnish.

Fallen Angel

After many mistakes, Accounts Manager Tara Steffens found the perfect citrus forward martini. Full gin flavor, with a citrus finish. This martini is sure no angel.

  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 oz. St. Germain’s
  • 1 oz. lime juice
  • 3/4 oz. lime juice
  • 3-5 dashes grapefruit bitters

Build in a shaker full of ice. Shake well until blended. Strain into martini glass. Garnish with orange wheel.

The Berlusconi

Pinckney Bend Apprentice Distiller Keith Meyer created his take on a dessert cocktail with an elegant flair, and named in honor of the hard-partying, billionaire ex-Prime Minister of Italy. This spirit-based float is unpredictable, so it’s a good thing it’s rich.

  • 1 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1/4 oz. Campari
  • 3/4 oz. Triple Sec
  • 1/2 oz. Sweet Vermouth
  • Club Soda
  • Orange Sorbet
  • Mint Spring Garnish

Combine Gin, Campari, Triple Sec and Vermouth in shaker full of ice. Strain into Martini glass. Add club soda, leaving a bit of room. Float sorbet into glass. Garnish with mint.

Bee’s Knees

A popular prohibition-era libation, and one of Senior Staff member Tara’s favorites, this cocktail was originally made with a honey syrup to mask the strong odor of prohibition gin. Here we offer both a classic style and our modern twist with a honey liquor to enhance the flavors of our American style gin. It’s the very best, the cat’s pajamas, the eel’s hips and it hits on all sixes. That enough Prohibition slang for ya?

Classic Bee’s Knees
  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 3/4 oz. fresh lemon juice
  • 3/4 oz. Honey Syrup ( use equal parts honey and warm water)

Shake with ice, serve in a rocks glass with a slice of lemon

Modern Bee’s Knees
  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 oz. Barenjager
  • 1/2 oz. lemon juice
  • Lemon Peel or Honeycomb garnish

Combine all in shaker until frothy. Fill a rocks glass to the brim with shaved ice. Pour over and let rest. Garnish with peel or honeycomb.


Signature Cocktail Recipes

Pour gin, lime and raspberry liqueur into a highball glass of ice. Stir gently. Top with Ginger Ale. For more “ginger” kick add a few dashes of cocktail bitters.

White Lady

She may look delicate, but she’s a strong woman. As seen on Pour at Four.

  • 2oz Gin
  • 1/2oz Orange Liqueur
  • 1/2oz Fresh Lemon Juice
  • 1 Fresh Egg White

Add all into shaker with ice. Shake until frothy. Strain into chilled coupe.

Stork Club Cooler

The New York City Stork Cllub was a hot spot for movie starts in the 40s. This one was a chief barman, Nathaniel Cook, favorite. As seen on Pour at Four

  • 2oz Gin
  • Juice of half an orange
  • 1 tsp Sugar
  • 1 Fresh Egg White (optional)

Shake well & Strain over a collins glass of shaved ice.

JockeyClub

Some say the Jockey Club was another name for a Manhattan during the late 1800s. But as many cocktails due, over time subtle changes can make all the difference. As seen on Pour at Four

  • 2oz Gin
  • .5oz Amaretto
  • 1 tsp Triple Sec
  • 1 dash bitters
  • .25oz Lemon Juice

Shake all and strain into lowball over crushed ice.

Singapore Sling

We First crafted at the Long Bar in the early 1900s, it’s one of the few “tiki” classes to use Gin, As seen on Pour at Four.

  • ¾ oz Gin
  • ¼ oz Grand Marnier
  • ¼ oz Cherry Liqueur
  • ¼ oz Herbal Liqueur (Benedictine/Big O)
  • 1 oz Pineapple Juice
  • ½ oz Lime Juice
  • 1 Dash Bitters
  • Club Soda

Add all but garnish and club into a shaker with ice. Shake well. Strain into a hurricane or highball glass and top with club soda. Garnish with cherry and orange.

Ramos Gin Fizz

Order this classic New Orleans cocktail and you’ll either be greated with delight or a smack on the face. Somewhere between a gin fizz and a milkshake, it takes many shakes (and people) to make this drink popular.

  • 2oz Gin
  • .5oz Heavy Cream
  • .5oz Fresh Lemon Juice
  • .5oz Fresh Lime Juice
  • 3/4oz Simple Syrup
  • 3 Dashes Orange Flower Water
  • 1 Fresh Egg White
  • Club Soda to Top

Add all but club soda into a shaker. Dry shake for 30 seconds. Add ice. Shake for 2 minutes or until cup is frosted. Strain into Collins over shaved ice. Pour a little bit of club back and forth between the empty halves of the shaker to pick up any residual. Pour over glass.

Pinckney Lady

We’ve updated the classic prohibition cocktail, The Pink Lady, by replacing the grenadine with our more flavorful tonic syrup. Slightly fruity with blossoming herbal notes, this blushing cocktail has been around a long time for a reason.

Shake all ingredients very well over ice. Straining into cocktail or martini glass. Egg white should have frothed to leave a thin head. Garnish with Cherry.

Aviation

The Aviation was created by Hugo Ensslin in New York in the early twentieth century. One of the lost cocktails of prohibition, the Aviation is making a return due to its bright and refreshing taste.

  • 2 oz Pinckney Bend Gin
  • .5 oz Maraschino liqueur
  • .25 oz Creme de violette or Creme Yvette
  • .75 oz Lemon Juice

Add all ingredients to a shaker and fill with ice. Shake and strain into martini glass.

Negroni

The most reported account of this drinks creation is from Florence, Italy in 1919. Count Camillo Negroni asked his barkeep to strengthen his favorite cocktail, the Americano, by adding gin instead of seltzer. No matter the origin, the Negroni is one of the world’s indispensable cocktails.

  • 1-1/2 oz Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 3/4 oz Campari
  • 3/4 oz Italian (Rosso) Vermouth
  • Orange Peel Garnish

Shake well with cracked ice. Strain into chilled collins glass and garnish with a twist of orange peel.

Gin Rickey

Invented in a DC bar called Shoemaker’s during an especially brutal heat wave in the 1890s, the gin rickey is one of summer’s great joys. Refreshingly bubbly and pleasantly bitter, this Gilded Age refridgerator demonstrates how people made it thru summers without air conditioning

Fill a highball glass with ice and add gin. Juice the lime halves into the glass and drop in the the lime shells as garnish. Fill with club soda.

Southside

According to one story, the drink was the favorite of Al Capone who dominated Chicago’s South side. The gin imported by his rivals on the North Side was smooth and usually consumed with ginger ale. Capone’s gin was rougher and required more sweetness to make it palatable.

  • 2 oz Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 10-12 Mint Leaves, muddled
  • 3/4 oz Simple syrup
  • 1 oz lemon juice

Muddle the mint into the bottom of a shakre. Add ice, gin, lemon juice and simple syrup into shaker. Shake vigorously. Strain into a chilled martini glass and garnish with mint.

French 75

The 75-millimeter M1897, a light, potent little gun with a vicious rate of fire, was the mainstay of the French field artillery in World War I. Hence the drink that was favored by the Lost Generation. Of all the many champagne-and-liquor combinations known to contemporary mixology, this one has the most élan.

  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 tsp superfine sugar
  • 1/4 oz. St. Germain
  • 1/2 oz lemon juice
  • 5oz Brut champagne
  • Lemon Rind for garnish

Shake well with cracked ice in a chilled shaker, then strain into a flute. Top with Champagne.

Gin Gin Mule

Pinckney Bend Accounts Manager Tara Steffens loves mules, but hates vodka. This is her take on a classic buck, with a Pinckney Bend Twist.

  • 1.5 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 oz. Simple Syrup
  • 1/4 oz. St. Germain
  • 3/4 oz. Lime Juice
  • 1 Dash Mint Bitters (optional)
  • 4 oz. Gosling’s Ginger Beer
  • Mint Spring or Lime Garnish

Fill rocks class with ice. Build all over and top with Ginger Beer. Stir and garnish.

Fallen Angel

After many mistakes, Accounts Manager Tara Steffens found the perfect citrus forward martini. Full gin flavor, with a citrus finish. This martini is sure no angel.

  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 oz. St. Germain’s
  • 1 oz. lime juice
  • 3/4 oz. lime juice
  • 3-5 dashes grapefruit bitters

Build in a shaker full of ice. Shake well until blended. Strain into martini glass. Garnish with orange wheel.

The Berlusconi

Pinckney Bend Apprentice Distiller Keith Meyer created his take on a dessert cocktail with an elegant flair, and named in honor of the hard-partying, billionaire ex-Prime Minister of Italy. This spirit-based float is unpredictable, so it’s a good thing it’s rich.

  • 1 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1/4 oz. Campari
  • 3/4 oz. Triple Sec
  • 1/2 oz. Sweet Vermouth
  • Club Soda
  • Orange Sorbet
  • Mint Spring Garnish

Combine Gin, Campari, Triple Sec and Vermouth in shaker full of ice. Strain into Martini glass. Add club soda, leaving a bit of room. Float sorbet into glass. Garnish with mint.

Bee’s Knees

A popular prohibition-era libation, and one of Senior Staff member Tara’s favorites, this cocktail was originally made with a honey syrup to mask the strong odor of prohibition gin. Here we offer both a classic style and our modern twist with a honey liquor to enhance the flavors of our American style gin. It’s the very best, the cat’s pajamas, the eel’s hips and it hits on all sixes. That enough Prohibition slang for ya?

Classic Bee’s Knees
  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 3/4 oz. fresh lemon juice
  • 3/4 oz. Honey Syrup ( use equal parts honey and warm water)

Shake with ice, serve in a rocks glass with a slice of lemon

Modern Bee’s Knees
  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 oz. Barenjager
  • 1/2 oz. lemon juice
  • Lemon Peel or Honeycomb garnish

Combine all in shaker until frothy. Fill a rocks glass to the brim with shaved ice. Pour over and let rest. Garnish with peel or honeycomb.


Signature Cocktail Recipes

Pour gin, lime and raspberry liqueur into a highball glass of ice. Stir gently. Top with Ginger Ale. For more “ginger” kick add a few dashes of cocktail bitters.

White Lady

She may look delicate, but she’s a strong woman. As seen on Pour at Four.

  • 2oz Gin
  • 1/2oz Orange Liqueur
  • 1/2oz Fresh Lemon Juice
  • 1 Fresh Egg White

Add all into shaker with ice. Shake until frothy. Strain into chilled coupe.

Stork Club Cooler

The New York City Stork Cllub was a hot spot for movie starts in the 40s. This one was a chief barman, Nathaniel Cook, favorite. As seen on Pour at Four

  • 2oz Gin
  • Juice of half an orange
  • 1 tsp Sugar
  • 1 Fresh Egg White (optional)

Shake well & Strain over a collins glass of shaved ice.

JockeyClub

Some say the Jockey Club was another name for a Manhattan during the late 1800s. But as many cocktails due, over time subtle changes can make all the difference. As seen on Pour at Four

  • 2oz Gin
  • .5oz Amaretto
  • 1 tsp Triple Sec
  • 1 dash bitters
  • .25oz Lemon Juice

Shake all and strain into lowball over crushed ice.

Singapore Sling

We First crafted at the Long Bar in the early 1900s, it’s one of the few “tiki” classes to use Gin, As seen on Pour at Four.

  • ¾ oz Gin
  • ¼ oz Grand Marnier
  • ¼ oz Cherry Liqueur
  • ¼ oz Herbal Liqueur (Benedictine/Big O)
  • 1 oz Pineapple Juice
  • ½ oz Lime Juice
  • 1 Dash Bitters
  • Club Soda

Add all but garnish and club into a shaker with ice. Shake well. Strain into a hurricane or highball glass and top with club soda. Garnish with cherry and orange.

Ramos Gin Fizz

Order this classic New Orleans cocktail and you’ll either be greated with delight or a smack on the face. Somewhere between a gin fizz and a milkshake, it takes many shakes (and people) to make this drink popular.

  • 2oz Gin
  • .5oz Heavy Cream
  • .5oz Fresh Lemon Juice
  • .5oz Fresh Lime Juice
  • 3/4oz Simple Syrup
  • 3 Dashes Orange Flower Water
  • 1 Fresh Egg White
  • Club Soda to Top

Add all but club soda into a shaker. Dry shake for 30 seconds. Add ice. Shake for 2 minutes or until cup is frosted. Strain into Collins over shaved ice. Pour a little bit of club back and forth between the empty halves of the shaker to pick up any residual. Pour over glass.

Pinckney Lady

We’ve updated the classic prohibition cocktail, The Pink Lady, by replacing the grenadine with our more flavorful tonic syrup. Slightly fruity with blossoming herbal notes, this blushing cocktail has been around a long time for a reason.

Shake all ingredients very well over ice. Straining into cocktail or martini glass. Egg white should have frothed to leave a thin head. Garnish with Cherry.

Aviation

The Aviation was created by Hugo Ensslin in New York in the early twentieth century. One of the lost cocktails of prohibition, the Aviation is making a return due to its bright and refreshing taste.

  • 2 oz Pinckney Bend Gin
  • .5 oz Maraschino liqueur
  • .25 oz Creme de violette or Creme Yvette
  • .75 oz Lemon Juice

Add all ingredients to a shaker and fill with ice. Shake and strain into martini glass.

Negroni

The most reported account of this drinks creation is from Florence, Italy in 1919. Count Camillo Negroni asked his barkeep to strengthen his favorite cocktail, the Americano, by adding gin instead of seltzer. No matter the origin, the Negroni is one of the world’s indispensable cocktails.

  • 1-1/2 oz Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 3/4 oz Campari
  • 3/4 oz Italian (Rosso) Vermouth
  • Orange Peel Garnish

Shake well with cracked ice. Strain into chilled collins glass and garnish with a twist of orange peel.

Gin Rickey

Invented in a DC bar called Shoemaker’s during an especially brutal heat wave in the 1890s, the gin rickey is one of summer’s great joys. Refreshingly bubbly and pleasantly bitter, this Gilded Age refridgerator demonstrates how people made it thru summers without air conditioning

Fill a highball glass with ice and add gin. Juice the lime halves into the glass and drop in the the lime shells as garnish. Fill with club soda.

Southside

According to one story, the drink was the favorite of Al Capone who dominated Chicago’s South side. The gin imported by his rivals on the North Side was smooth and usually consumed with ginger ale. Capone’s gin was rougher and required more sweetness to make it palatable.

  • 2 oz Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 10-12 Mint Leaves, muddled
  • 3/4 oz Simple syrup
  • 1 oz lemon juice

Muddle the mint into the bottom of a shakre. Add ice, gin, lemon juice and simple syrup into shaker. Shake vigorously. Strain into a chilled martini glass and garnish with mint.

French 75

The 75-millimeter M1897, a light, potent little gun with a vicious rate of fire, was the mainstay of the French field artillery in World War I. Hence the drink that was favored by the Lost Generation. Of all the many champagne-and-liquor combinations known to contemporary mixology, this one has the most élan.

  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 tsp superfine sugar
  • 1/4 oz. St. Germain
  • 1/2 oz lemon juice
  • 5oz Brut champagne
  • Lemon Rind for garnish

Shake well with cracked ice in a chilled shaker, then strain into a flute. Top with Champagne.

Gin Gin Mule

Pinckney Bend Accounts Manager Tara Steffens loves mules, but hates vodka. This is her take on a classic buck, with a Pinckney Bend Twist.

  • 1.5 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 oz. Simple Syrup
  • 1/4 oz. St. Germain
  • 3/4 oz. Lime Juice
  • 1 Dash Mint Bitters (optional)
  • 4 oz. Gosling’s Ginger Beer
  • Mint Spring or Lime Garnish

Fill rocks class with ice. Build all over and top with Ginger Beer. Stir and garnish.

Fallen Angel

After many mistakes, Accounts Manager Tara Steffens found the perfect citrus forward martini. Full gin flavor, with a citrus finish. This martini is sure no angel.

  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 oz. St. Germain’s
  • 1 oz. lime juice
  • 3/4 oz. lime juice
  • 3-5 dashes grapefruit bitters

Build in a shaker full of ice. Shake well until blended. Strain into martini glass. Garnish with orange wheel.

The Berlusconi

Pinckney Bend Apprentice Distiller Keith Meyer created his take on a dessert cocktail with an elegant flair, and named in honor of the hard-partying, billionaire ex-Prime Minister of Italy. This spirit-based float is unpredictable, so it’s a good thing it’s rich.

  • 1 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1/4 oz. Campari
  • 3/4 oz. Triple Sec
  • 1/2 oz. Sweet Vermouth
  • Club Soda
  • Orange Sorbet
  • Mint Spring Garnish

Combine Gin, Campari, Triple Sec and Vermouth in shaker full of ice. Strain into Martini glass. Add club soda, leaving a bit of room. Float sorbet into glass. Garnish with mint.

Bee’s Knees

A popular prohibition-era libation, and one of Senior Staff member Tara’s favorites, this cocktail was originally made with a honey syrup to mask the strong odor of prohibition gin. Here we offer both a classic style and our modern twist with a honey liquor to enhance the flavors of our American style gin. It’s the very best, the cat’s pajamas, the eel’s hips and it hits on all sixes. That enough Prohibition slang for ya?

Classic Bee’s Knees
  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 3/4 oz. fresh lemon juice
  • 3/4 oz. Honey Syrup ( use equal parts honey and warm water)

Shake with ice, serve in a rocks glass with a slice of lemon

Modern Bee’s Knees
  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 oz. Barenjager
  • 1/2 oz. lemon juice
  • Lemon Peel or Honeycomb garnish

Combine all in shaker until frothy. Fill a rocks glass to the brim with shaved ice. Pour over and let rest. Garnish with peel or honeycomb.


Signature Cocktail Recipes

Pour gin, lime and raspberry liqueur into a highball glass of ice. Stir gently. Top with Ginger Ale. For more “ginger” kick add a few dashes of cocktail bitters.

White Lady

She may look delicate, but she’s a strong woman. As seen on Pour at Four.

  • 2oz Gin
  • 1/2oz Orange Liqueur
  • 1/2oz Fresh Lemon Juice
  • 1 Fresh Egg White

Add all into shaker with ice. Shake until frothy. Strain into chilled coupe.

Stork Club Cooler

The New York City Stork Cllub was a hot spot for movie starts in the 40s. This one was a chief barman, Nathaniel Cook, favorite. As seen on Pour at Four

  • 2oz Gin
  • Juice of half an orange
  • 1 tsp Sugar
  • 1 Fresh Egg White (optional)

Shake well & Strain over a collins glass of shaved ice.

JockeyClub

Some say the Jockey Club was another name for a Manhattan during the late 1800s. But as many cocktails due, over time subtle changes can make all the difference. As seen on Pour at Four

  • 2oz Gin
  • .5oz Amaretto
  • 1 tsp Triple Sec
  • 1 dash bitters
  • .25oz Lemon Juice

Shake all and strain into lowball over crushed ice.

Singapore Sling

We First crafted at the Long Bar in the early 1900s, it’s one of the few “tiki” classes to use Gin, As seen on Pour at Four.

  • ¾ oz Gin
  • ¼ oz Grand Marnier
  • ¼ oz Cherry Liqueur
  • ¼ oz Herbal Liqueur (Benedictine/Big O)
  • 1 oz Pineapple Juice
  • ½ oz Lime Juice
  • 1 Dash Bitters
  • Club Soda

Add all but garnish and club into a shaker with ice. Shake well. Strain into a hurricane or highball glass and top with club soda. Garnish with cherry and orange.

Ramos Gin Fizz

Order this classic New Orleans cocktail and you’ll either be greated with delight or a smack on the face. Somewhere between a gin fizz and a milkshake, it takes many shakes (and people) to make this drink popular.

  • 2oz Gin
  • .5oz Heavy Cream
  • .5oz Fresh Lemon Juice
  • .5oz Fresh Lime Juice
  • 3/4oz Simple Syrup
  • 3 Dashes Orange Flower Water
  • 1 Fresh Egg White
  • Club Soda to Top

Add all but club soda into a shaker. Dry shake for 30 seconds. Add ice. Shake for 2 minutes or until cup is frosted. Strain into Collins over shaved ice. Pour a little bit of club back and forth between the empty halves of the shaker to pick up any residual. Pour over glass.

Pinckney Lady

We’ve updated the classic prohibition cocktail, The Pink Lady, by replacing the grenadine with our more flavorful tonic syrup. Slightly fruity with blossoming herbal notes, this blushing cocktail has been around a long time for a reason.

Shake all ingredients very well over ice. Straining into cocktail or martini glass. Egg white should have frothed to leave a thin head. Garnish with Cherry.

Aviation

The Aviation was created by Hugo Ensslin in New York in the early twentieth century. One of the lost cocktails of prohibition, the Aviation is making a return due to its bright and refreshing taste.

  • 2 oz Pinckney Bend Gin
  • .5 oz Maraschino liqueur
  • .25 oz Creme de violette or Creme Yvette
  • .75 oz Lemon Juice

Add all ingredients to a shaker and fill with ice. Shake and strain into martini glass.

Negroni

The most reported account of this drinks creation is from Florence, Italy in 1919. Count Camillo Negroni asked his barkeep to strengthen his favorite cocktail, the Americano, by adding gin instead of seltzer. No matter the origin, the Negroni is one of the world’s indispensable cocktails.

  • 1-1/2 oz Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 3/4 oz Campari
  • 3/4 oz Italian (Rosso) Vermouth
  • Orange Peel Garnish

Shake well with cracked ice. Strain into chilled collins glass and garnish with a twist of orange peel.

Gin Rickey

Invented in a DC bar called Shoemaker’s during an especially brutal heat wave in the 1890s, the gin rickey is one of summer’s great joys. Refreshingly bubbly and pleasantly bitter, this Gilded Age refridgerator demonstrates how people made it thru summers without air conditioning

Fill a highball glass with ice and add gin. Juice the lime halves into the glass and drop in the the lime shells as garnish. Fill with club soda.

Southside

According to one story, the drink was the favorite of Al Capone who dominated Chicago’s South side. The gin imported by his rivals on the North Side was smooth and usually consumed with ginger ale. Capone’s gin was rougher and required more sweetness to make it palatable.

  • 2 oz Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 10-12 Mint Leaves, muddled
  • 3/4 oz Simple syrup
  • 1 oz lemon juice

Muddle the mint into the bottom of a shakre. Add ice, gin, lemon juice and simple syrup into shaker. Shake vigorously. Strain into a chilled martini glass and garnish with mint.

French 75

The 75-millimeter M1897, a light, potent little gun with a vicious rate of fire, was the mainstay of the French field artillery in World War I. Hence the drink that was favored by the Lost Generation. Of all the many champagne-and-liquor combinations known to contemporary mixology, this one has the most élan.

  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 tsp superfine sugar
  • 1/4 oz. St. Germain
  • 1/2 oz lemon juice
  • 5oz Brut champagne
  • Lemon Rind for garnish

Shake well with cracked ice in a chilled shaker, then strain into a flute. Top with Champagne.

Gin Gin Mule

Pinckney Bend Accounts Manager Tara Steffens loves mules, but hates vodka. This is her take on a classic buck, with a Pinckney Bend Twist.

  • 1.5 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 oz. Simple Syrup
  • 1/4 oz. St. Germain
  • 3/4 oz. Lime Juice
  • 1 Dash Mint Bitters (optional)
  • 4 oz. Gosling’s Ginger Beer
  • Mint Spring or Lime Garnish

Fill rocks class with ice. Build all over and top with Ginger Beer. Stir and garnish.

Fallen Angel

After many mistakes, Accounts Manager Tara Steffens found the perfect citrus forward martini. Full gin flavor, with a citrus finish. This martini is sure no angel.

  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 oz. St. Germain’s
  • 1 oz. lime juice
  • 3/4 oz. lime juice
  • 3-5 dashes grapefruit bitters

Build in a shaker full of ice. Shake well until blended. Strain into martini glass. Garnish with orange wheel.

The Berlusconi

Pinckney Bend Apprentice Distiller Keith Meyer created his take on a dessert cocktail with an elegant flair, and named in honor of the hard-partying, billionaire ex-Prime Minister of Italy. This spirit-based float is unpredictable, so it’s a good thing it’s rich.

  • 1 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1/4 oz. Campari
  • 3/4 oz. Triple Sec
  • 1/2 oz. Sweet Vermouth
  • Club Soda
  • Orange Sorbet
  • Mint Spring Garnish

Combine Gin, Campari, Triple Sec and Vermouth in shaker full of ice. Strain into Martini glass. Add club soda, leaving a bit of room. Float sorbet into glass. Garnish with mint.

Bee’s Knees

A popular prohibition-era libation, and one of Senior Staff member Tara’s favorites, this cocktail was originally made with a honey syrup to mask the strong odor of prohibition gin. Here we offer both a classic style and our modern twist with a honey liquor to enhance the flavors of our American style gin. It’s the very best, the cat’s pajamas, the eel’s hips and it hits on all sixes. That enough Prohibition slang for ya?

Classic Bee’s Knees
  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 3/4 oz. fresh lemon juice
  • 3/4 oz. Honey Syrup ( use equal parts honey and warm water)

Shake with ice, serve in a rocks glass with a slice of lemon

Modern Bee’s Knees
  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 oz. Barenjager
  • 1/2 oz. lemon juice
  • Lemon Peel or Honeycomb garnish

Combine all in shaker until frothy. Fill a rocks glass to the brim with shaved ice. Pour over and let rest. Garnish with peel or honeycomb.


Signature Cocktail Recipes

Pour gin, lime and raspberry liqueur into a highball glass of ice. Stir gently. Top with Ginger Ale. For more “ginger” kick add a few dashes of cocktail bitters.

White Lady

She may look delicate, but she’s a strong woman. As seen on Pour at Four.

  • 2oz Gin
  • 1/2oz Orange Liqueur
  • 1/2oz Fresh Lemon Juice
  • 1 Fresh Egg White

Add all into shaker with ice. Shake until frothy. Strain into chilled coupe.

Stork Club Cooler

The New York City Stork Cllub was a hot spot for movie starts in the 40s. This one was a chief barman, Nathaniel Cook, favorite. As seen on Pour at Four

  • 2oz Gin
  • Juice of half an orange
  • 1 tsp Sugar
  • 1 Fresh Egg White (optional)

Shake well & Strain over a collins glass of shaved ice.

JockeyClub

Some say the Jockey Club was another name for a Manhattan during the late 1800s. But as many cocktails due, over time subtle changes can make all the difference. As seen on Pour at Four

  • 2oz Gin
  • .5oz Amaretto
  • 1 tsp Triple Sec
  • 1 dash bitters
  • .25oz Lemon Juice

Shake all and strain into lowball over crushed ice.

Singapore Sling

We First crafted at the Long Bar in the early 1900s, it’s one of the few “tiki” classes to use Gin, As seen on Pour at Four.

  • ¾ oz Gin
  • ¼ oz Grand Marnier
  • ¼ oz Cherry Liqueur
  • ¼ oz Herbal Liqueur (Benedictine/Big O)
  • 1 oz Pineapple Juice
  • ½ oz Lime Juice
  • 1 Dash Bitters
  • Club Soda

Add all but garnish and club into a shaker with ice. Shake well. Strain into a hurricane or highball glass and top with club soda. Garnish with cherry and orange.

Ramos Gin Fizz

Order this classic New Orleans cocktail and you’ll either be greated with delight or a smack on the face. Somewhere between a gin fizz and a milkshake, it takes many shakes (and people) to make this drink popular.

  • 2oz Gin
  • .5oz Heavy Cream
  • .5oz Fresh Lemon Juice
  • .5oz Fresh Lime Juice
  • 3/4oz Simple Syrup
  • 3 Dashes Orange Flower Water
  • 1 Fresh Egg White
  • Club Soda to Top

Add all but club soda into a shaker. Dry shake for 30 seconds. Add ice. Shake for 2 minutes or until cup is frosted. Strain into Collins over shaved ice. Pour a little bit of club back and forth between the empty halves of the shaker to pick up any residual. Pour over glass.

Pinckney Lady

We’ve updated the classic prohibition cocktail, The Pink Lady, by replacing the grenadine with our more flavorful tonic syrup. Slightly fruity with blossoming herbal notes, this blushing cocktail has been around a long time for a reason.

Shake all ingredients very well over ice. Straining into cocktail or martini glass. Egg white should have frothed to leave a thin head. Garnish with Cherry.

Aviation

The Aviation was created by Hugo Ensslin in New York in the early twentieth century. One of the lost cocktails of prohibition, the Aviation is making a return due to its bright and refreshing taste.

  • 2 oz Pinckney Bend Gin
  • .5 oz Maraschino liqueur
  • .25 oz Creme de violette or Creme Yvette
  • .75 oz Lemon Juice

Add all ingredients to a shaker and fill with ice. Shake and strain into martini glass.

Negroni

The most reported account of this drinks creation is from Florence, Italy in 1919. Count Camillo Negroni asked his barkeep to strengthen his favorite cocktail, the Americano, by adding gin instead of seltzer. No matter the origin, the Negroni is one of the world’s indispensable cocktails.

  • 1-1/2 oz Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 3/4 oz Campari
  • 3/4 oz Italian (Rosso) Vermouth
  • Orange Peel Garnish

Shake well with cracked ice. Strain into chilled collins glass and garnish with a twist of orange peel.

Gin Rickey

Invented in a DC bar called Shoemaker’s during an especially brutal heat wave in the 1890s, the gin rickey is one of summer’s great joys. Refreshingly bubbly and pleasantly bitter, this Gilded Age refridgerator demonstrates how people made it thru summers without air conditioning

Fill a highball glass with ice and add gin. Juice the lime halves into the glass and drop in the the lime shells as garnish. Fill with club soda.

Southside

According to one story, the drink was the favorite of Al Capone who dominated Chicago’s South side. The gin imported by his rivals on the North Side was smooth and usually consumed with ginger ale. Capone’s gin was rougher and required more sweetness to make it palatable.

  • 2 oz Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 10-12 Mint Leaves, muddled
  • 3/4 oz Simple syrup
  • 1 oz lemon juice

Muddle the mint into the bottom of a shakre. Add ice, gin, lemon juice and simple syrup into shaker. Shake vigorously. Strain into a chilled martini glass and garnish with mint.

French 75

The 75-millimeter M1897, a light, potent little gun with a vicious rate of fire, was the mainstay of the French field artillery in World War I. Hence the drink that was favored by the Lost Generation. Of all the many champagne-and-liquor combinations known to contemporary mixology, this one has the most élan.

  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 tsp superfine sugar
  • 1/4 oz. St. Germain
  • 1/2 oz lemon juice
  • 5oz Brut champagne
  • Lemon Rind for garnish

Shake well with cracked ice in a chilled shaker, then strain into a flute. Top with Champagne.

Gin Gin Mule

Pinckney Bend Accounts Manager Tara Steffens loves mules, but hates vodka. This is her take on a classic buck, with a Pinckney Bend Twist.

  • 1.5 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 oz. Simple Syrup
  • 1/4 oz. St. Germain
  • 3/4 oz. Lime Juice
  • 1 Dash Mint Bitters (optional)
  • 4 oz. Gosling’s Ginger Beer
  • Mint Spring or Lime Garnish

Fill rocks class with ice. Build all over and top with Ginger Beer. Stir and garnish.

Fallen Angel

After many mistakes, Accounts Manager Tara Steffens found the perfect citrus forward martini. Full gin flavor, with a citrus finish. This martini is sure no angel.

  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 oz. St. Germain’s
  • 1 oz. lime juice
  • 3/4 oz. lime juice
  • 3-5 dashes grapefruit bitters

Build in a shaker full of ice. Shake well until blended. Strain into martini glass. Garnish with orange wheel.

The Berlusconi

Pinckney Bend Apprentice Distiller Keith Meyer created his take on a dessert cocktail with an elegant flair, and named in honor of the hard-partying, billionaire ex-Prime Minister of Italy. This spirit-based float is unpredictable, so it’s a good thing it’s rich.

  • 1 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1/4 oz. Campari
  • 3/4 oz. Triple Sec
  • 1/2 oz. Sweet Vermouth
  • Club Soda
  • Orange Sorbet
  • Mint Spring Garnish

Combine Gin, Campari, Triple Sec and Vermouth in shaker full of ice. Strain into Martini glass. Add club soda, leaving a bit of room. Float sorbet into glass. Garnish with mint.

Bee’s Knees

A popular prohibition-era libation, and one of Senior Staff member Tara’s favorites, this cocktail was originally made with a honey syrup to mask the strong odor of prohibition gin. Here we offer both a classic style and our modern twist with a honey liquor to enhance the flavors of our American style gin. It’s the very best, the cat’s pajamas, the eel’s hips and it hits on all sixes. That enough Prohibition slang for ya?

Classic Bee’s Knees
  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 3/4 oz. fresh lemon juice
  • 3/4 oz. Honey Syrup ( use equal parts honey and warm water)

Shake with ice, serve in a rocks glass with a slice of lemon

Modern Bee’s Knees
  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 oz. Barenjager
  • 1/2 oz. lemon juice
  • Lemon Peel or Honeycomb garnish

Combine all in shaker until frothy. Fill a rocks glass to the brim with shaved ice. Pour over and let rest. Garnish with peel or honeycomb.


Signature Cocktail Recipes

Pour gin, lime and raspberry liqueur into a highball glass of ice. Stir gently. Top with Ginger Ale. For more “ginger” kick add a few dashes of cocktail bitters.

White Lady

She may look delicate, but she’s a strong woman. As seen on Pour at Four.

  • 2oz Gin
  • 1/2oz Orange Liqueur
  • 1/2oz Fresh Lemon Juice
  • 1 Fresh Egg White

Add all into shaker with ice. Shake until frothy. Strain into chilled coupe.

Stork Club Cooler

The New York City Stork Cllub was a hot spot for movie starts in the 40s. This one was a chief barman, Nathaniel Cook, favorite. As seen on Pour at Four

  • 2oz Gin
  • Juice of half an orange
  • 1 tsp Sugar
  • 1 Fresh Egg White (optional)

Shake well & Strain over a collins glass of shaved ice.

JockeyClub

Some say the Jockey Club was another name for a Manhattan during the late 1800s. But as many cocktails due, over time subtle changes can make all the difference. As seen on Pour at Four

  • 2oz Gin
  • .5oz Amaretto
  • 1 tsp Triple Sec
  • 1 dash bitters
  • .25oz Lemon Juice

Shake all and strain into lowball over crushed ice.

Singapore Sling

We First crafted at the Long Bar in the early 1900s, it’s one of the few “tiki” classes to use Gin, As seen on Pour at Four.

  • ¾ oz Gin
  • ¼ oz Grand Marnier
  • ¼ oz Cherry Liqueur
  • ¼ oz Herbal Liqueur (Benedictine/Big O)
  • 1 oz Pineapple Juice
  • ½ oz Lime Juice
  • 1 Dash Bitters
  • Club Soda

Add all but garnish and club into a shaker with ice. Shake well. Strain into a hurricane or highball glass and top with club soda. Garnish with cherry and orange.

Ramos Gin Fizz

Order this classic New Orleans cocktail and you’ll either be greated with delight or a smack on the face. Somewhere between a gin fizz and a milkshake, it takes many shakes (and people) to make this drink popular.

  • 2oz Gin
  • .5oz Heavy Cream
  • .5oz Fresh Lemon Juice
  • .5oz Fresh Lime Juice
  • 3/4oz Simple Syrup
  • 3 Dashes Orange Flower Water
  • 1 Fresh Egg White
  • Club Soda to Top

Add all but club soda into a shaker. Dry shake for 30 seconds. Add ice. Shake for 2 minutes or until cup is frosted. Strain into Collins over shaved ice. Pour a little bit of club back and forth between the empty halves of the shaker to pick up any residual. Pour over glass.

Pinckney Lady

We’ve updated the classic prohibition cocktail, The Pink Lady, by replacing the grenadine with our more flavorful tonic syrup. Slightly fruity with blossoming herbal notes, this blushing cocktail has been around a long time for a reason.

Shake all ingredients very well over ice. Straining into cocktail or martini glass. Egg white should have frothed to leave a thin head. Garnish with Cherry.

Aviation

The Aviation was created by Hugo Ensslin in New York in the early twentieth century. One of the lost cocktails of prohibition, the Aviation is making a return due to its bright and refreshing taste.

  • 2 oz Pinckney Bend Gin
  • .5 oz Maraschino liqueur
  • .25 oz Creme de violette or Creme Yvette
  • .75 oz Lemon Juice

Add all ingredients to a shaker and fill with ice. Shake and strain into martini glass.

Negroni

The most reported account of this drinks creation is from Florence, Italy in 1919. Count Camillo Negroni asked his barkeep to strengthen his favorite cocktail, the Americano, by adding gin instead of seltzer. No matter the origin, the Negroni is one of the world’s indispensable cocktails.

  • 1-1/2 oz Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 3/4 oz Campari
  • 3/4 oz Italian (Rosso) Vermouth
  • Orange Peel Garnish

Shake well with cracked ice. Strain into chilled collins glass and garnish with a twist of orange peel.

Gin Rickey

Invented in a DC bar called Shoemaker’s during an especially brutal heat wave in the 1890s, the gin rickey is one of summer’s great joys. Refreshingly bubbly and pleasantly bitter, this Gilded Age refridgerator demonstrates how people made it thru summers without air conditioning

Fill a highball glass with ice and add gin. Juice the lime halves into the glass and drop in the the lime shells as garnish. Fill with club soda.

Southside

According to one story, the drink was the favorite of Al Capone who dominated Chicago’s South side. The gin imported by his rivals on the North Side was smooth and usually consumed with ginger ale. Capone’s gin was rougher and required more sweetness to make it palatable.

  • 2 oz Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 10-12 Mint Leaves, muddled
  • 3/4 oz Simple syrup
  • 1 oz lemon juice

Muddle the mint into the bottom of a shakre. Add ice, gin, lemon juice and simple syrup into shaker. Shake vigorously. Strain into a chilled martini glass and garnish with mint.

French 75

The 75-millimeter M1897, a light, potent little gun with a vicious rate of fire, was the mainstay of the French field artillery in World War I. Hence the drink that was favored by the Lost Generation. Of all the many champagne-and-liquor combinations known to contemporary mixology, this one has the most élan.

  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 tsp superfine sugar
  • 1/4 oz. St. Germain
  • 1/2 oz lemon juice
  • 5oz Brut champagne
  • Lemon Rind for garnish

Shake well with cracked ice in a chilled shaker, then strain into a flute. Top with Champagne.

Gin Gin Mule

Pinckney Bend Accounts Manager Tara Steffens loves mules, but hates vodka. This is her take on a classic buck, with a Pinckney Bend Twist.

  • 1.5 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 oz. Simple Syrup
  • 1/4 oz. St. Germain
  • 3/4 oz. Lime Juice
  • 1 Dash Mint Bitters (optional)
  • 4 oz. Gosling’s Ginger Beer
  • Mint Spring or Lime Garnish

Fill rocks class with ice. Build all over and top with Ginger Beer. Stir and garnish.

Fallen Angel

After many mistakes, Accounts Manager Tara Steffens found the perfect citrus forward martini. Full gin flavor, with a citrus finish. This martini is sure no angel.

  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 oz. St. Germain’s
  • 1 oz. lime juice
  • 3/4 oz. lime juice
  • 3-5 dashes grapefruit bitters

Build in a shaker full of ice. Shake well until blended. Strain into martini glass. Garnish with orange wheel.

The Berlusconi

Pinckney Bend Apprentice Distiller Keith Meyer created his take on a dessert cocktail with an elegant flair, and named in honor of the hard-partying, billionaire ex-Prime Minister of Italy. This spirit-based float is unpredictable, so it’s a good thing it’s rich.

  • 1 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1/4 oz. Campari
  • 3/4 oz. Triple Sec
  • 1/2 oz. Sweet Vermouth
  • Club Soda
  • Orange Sorbet
  • Mint Spring Garnish

Combine Gin, Campari, Triple Sec and Vermouth in shaker full of ice. Strain into Martini glass. Add club soda, leaving a bit of room. Float sorbet into glass. Garnish with mint.

Bee’s Knees

A popular prohibition-era libation, and one of Senior Staff member Tara’s favorites, this cocktail was originally made with a honey syrup to mask the strong odor of prohibition gin. Here we offer both a classic style and our modern twist with a honey liquor to enhance the flavors of our American style gin. It’s the very best, the cat’s pajamas, the eel’s hips and it hits on all sixes. That enough Prohibition slang for ya?

Classic Bee’s Knees
  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 3/4 oz. fresh lemon juice
  • 3/4 oz. Honey Syrup ( use equal parts honey and warm water)

Shake with ice, serve in a rocks glass with a slice of lemon

Modern Bee’s Knees
  • 2 oz. Pinckney Bend Gin
  • 1 oz. Barenjager
  • 1/2 oz. lemon juice
  • Lemon Peel or Honeycomb garnish

Combine all in shaker until frothy. Fill a rocks glass to the brim with shaved ice. Pour over and let rest. Garnish with peel or honeycomb.


Watch the video: Video Tour of the Bitter End Yacht Club at Virgin Gorda (November 2021).