New recipes

Scammers Are Using Fake FDA Warning Letters to Extort Patients for Money

Scammers Are Using Fake FDA Warning Letters to Extort Patients for Money

Here's how you can avoid being scammed.

The Food and Drug Administration is warning people of a scam that tries to scare people who fill their medical prescriptions online into giving their money or personal information.

Last week, the FDA said scam artists are posing as government officials issuing fake look-alike warning letters from the agency, accusing shoppers of potential violations of the law and asking consumers to stay quiet while they're "investigated," USA Today reports.

Stay up to date on what healthy means now.

Sign up for our daily newsletter for more great articles and delicious, healthy recipes.

“We know that at least three dozen consumers have been contacted and have received these warning letters,” FDA Spokeswoman Lyndsay Meyer told USA Today. She said that the federal agency is now investigating what is believed to be an extortion scam on an international level, but Meyer didn't reveal any victims’ names thus far.

The FDA has received more than three dozen complaints about the fake letter from Americans over the last few weeks. According to Bloomberg, the fake letters look and feel quite real—they bear the correct logo and contact information, and they also have customers' financial information plainly listed in writing.

More on the FDA:

The fake letters ask victims to respond with further information and also urges them to not contact any officials, threatening "legal steps" should the sender hear of “any suspicious activity from your end," Bloomberg reports.

But Meyer says these letters should easily raise eyebrows, since they use incorrect grammar and odd word phrasing. The quickest way to avoid being a victim of the scam is somewhat simple: Don't buy medication or prescription drugs online from any third party.

“This scam associated with these purchases is not uncommon, however a scam of this nature where sending state warning letters is unique,” Meyer told USA Today. “We have always warned that buying medicines online from illegal online pharmacies or people who are unlicensed to sell medicine carry a number of risks."

FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb set the record straight on whether or not customers shopping for medication online should ever pay attention to FDA correspondence. “Consumers who aren’t involved in manufacturing or distributing FDA regulated products should be on alert that if you get an FDA warning letter, it’s probably fake, and probably a scam,” he wrote in an official statement. Generally, the FDA doesn't take this type of action against a single shopper—even if they knew the online site from which they purchased from is legal or not.

Back in 2015, the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy reviewed more than 11,000 websites selling prescription medications—they found that more than 95 percent of these sites weren't in check with current laws and safety standards. If anything, this scam teaches us all that when it comes to prescription medicine, staying off the internet is best.


Authorities warn of scammers impersonating DEA officials

Photo: MGN.

KSTP
Updated: July 29, 2020 04:37 PM
Created: July 29, 2020 04:26 PM

The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is warning people of scammers impersonating their employees in an effort to defraud and extort victims.

The DEA said the scammers call victims while spoofing DEA phone numbers so it appears the call is actually from the DEA. They then threaten to arrest, prosecute and imprison victims for alleged violations of federal drug laws or involvement in drug trafficking activities unless victims pay a fine over the phone, via wire transfer or through gift cards.

According to the DEA, callers use fake names and badge numbers or names of well-known DEA officials and may:

  • Use an urgent and aggressive tone, refusing to speak to or leave a message with anyone other than their targeted victim
  • Threaten arrest, prosecution, imprisonment, and, in the case of medical practitioners, revocation of their DEA numbers
  • Demand thousands of dollars via wire transfer or, in some instances, in the form of untraceable gift cards taken over the phone
  • Falsify the number on caller ID to appear as a legitimate DEA phone number
  • Ask for personal information, such as a social security number or date of birth
  • Reference National Provider Identifier numbers and/or state license numbers when calling a medical practitioner. They also might claim that patients are making accusations against that practitioner.

The DEA said its employees will never contact people by phone to demand money or any form of payment or sensitive or personal information. DEA officials only notify people of legitimate investigations or legal action through official letters or in-person.

Anyone who receives a call they believe is someone impersonating a DEA official is urged to report it online or by calling 877-792-2873. You can find more information here.


Romance Scams  

Romance scams occur when a criminal adopts a fake online identity to gain a victim’s affection and trust. The scammer then uses the illusion of a romantic or close relationship to manipulate and/or steal from the victim.

The criminals who carry out romance scams are experts at what they do and will seem genuine, caring, and believable. Con artists are present on most dating and social media sites.

The scammer’s intention is to establish a relationship as quickly as possible, endear himself to the victim, and gain trust. Scammers may propose marriage and make plans to meet in person, but that will never happen. Eventually, they will ask for money.

Scam artists often say they are in the building and construction industry and are engaged in projects outside the U.S. That makes it easier to avoid meeting in person—and more plausible when they ask for money for a medical emergency or unexpected legal fee.

If someone you meet online needs your bank account information to deposit money, they are most likely using your account to carry out other theft and fraud schemes.


No, someone did not rent a car under your name to smuggle drugs -- DEA issues scam warning

DETROIT (FOX 2) - The Drug Enforcement Agency issued a warning about scammers posing as agents to get personal information from people.

According to the agency, scammers are calling victims and telling them stories to trick them.

In one incident, the scammer called and told the victim their name was used to rent a car that was stopped at the border for drugs. The scammer told the victim they needed to verify their Social Security number.

Other scams include telling victims that their bank account has been compromised. In some cases, the caller threatens that the victim will be arrested if they do not send money via gift cards or wire transfers. 

Listen to one of those scam calls:

DEA issues warning about scammers impersonating agents

The DEA has issued a warning about scammers impersonating their agents in an effort to extort money from victims.

"Our office receives 3-5 calls a month from people all over the country, often moments after they have gotten off the phone with these con artists," said Detroit Field Division Special Agent in Charge Keith Martin. "DEA will never request personal or sensitive information over the phone, and will only notify people of a legitimate investigation or legal action in person or by official letter. In fact, no legitimate federal law enforcement officer will demand cash or gift cards from a member of the public."

According to the DEA, some scammers have even spoofed phone numbers so it appears the call is coming from the actual agency. They have also sent photos of law enforcement credentials that are fake but appear real.


DEA Warning: Scammers impersonating DEA, FBI agents are stealing identities, money

The Drug Enforcement Administration is warning the public of a widespread fraud scheme in which telephone scammers impersonate DEA agents in an attempt to extort money or steal personally identifiable information.

A new public service announcement aims to raise awareness that DEA will never phone demanding money or asking for personal information. There are variations in the false narrative, among them, that the target’s name was used to rent a vehicle that was stopped at the border and contained a large quantity of drugs.

The caller then has the target verify their social security number or tells the target their bank account has been compromised.

In some cases, the caller threatens the target with arrest for the fictional drug seizure and instructs the person, over the phone, to send money via gift card or wire transfer to pay a “fine” or to assist with the investigation or with resetting the bank account.

Employing more sophisticated tactics, Schemers have spoofed legitimate DEA phone numbers to convince their target that the call is legitimate, or texted photos of what appears to be a legitimate law enforcement credential with a photo.

The reported scam tactics continually change but often share many of the same characteristics. Callers use fake names and badge numbers as well as names of well-known DEA officials or police officers in local departments. Additionally, they may:

  • use an urgent and aggressive tone, refusing to speak to or leave a message with anyone other than their targeted victim
  • threaten arrest, prosecution, imprisonment, and, in the case of medical practitioners and pharmacists, revocation of their DEA registration
  • demand thousands of dollars via wire transfer or in the form of untraceable gift card numbers the victim is told to provide over the phone
  • ask for personal information, such as social security number or date of birth
  • reference National Provider Identifier numbers and/or state license numbers when calling a medical practitioner. They also may claim that patients are making accusations against that practitioner.

DEA personnel will never contact members of the public or medical practitioners by telephone to demand money or any other form of payment, will never request personal or sensitive information over the phone, and will only notify people of a legitimate investigation or legal action in person or by official letter.

In fact, no legitimate federal law enforcement officer will demand cash or gift cards from a member of the public. You should only give money, gift cards, personally identifiable information, including bank account information, to someone you know.

The best deterrence against these bad actors is awareness and caution. Anyone receiving a call from a person claiming to be with DEA should report the incident to the FBI at www.ic3.gov.

The Federal Trade Commission provides recovery steps, shares information with more than 3,000 law enforcement agencies and takes reports at reportfraud.ftc.gov. For any victims who have given personally identifiable information like a social security number to the caller, can learn how to protect against identity theft at identitytheft.gov.

Reporting these scam calls will help federal authorities find, arrest, and stop the criminals engaged in this fraud. Impersonating a federal agent is a violation of federal law, punishable by up to three years in prison aggravated identity theft carries a mandatory minimum sentence of two years in prison plus fines and restitution.


DEA warns public of recent fraud scheme

(KWQC) - The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is warning the public of a recent fraud scheme.

Officials with the DEA say telephone scammers impersonate DEA agents in an attempt to extort money or to steal personally-identifiable information.

There are variations in the scam, according to officials, where they say your name was used to rent a vehicle that was stopped at the border and contained a large number of drugs. The caller then asks for you to verify your social security number or that your bank account information has been compromised.

Officials say some have threatened to arrest others for the fake drug seizure and instructs them to send money via a gift card or to wire transfer to pay a “fine”.

The reported scam tactics continually change but often share many of the same characteristics. Callers use fake names and badge numbers as well as names of well-known DEA officials or police officers in local departments.

  • Use an urgent and aggressive tone
  • Refusing to speak to or leave a message with anyone other than their targeted victim
  • Threaten arrest, prosecution, imprisonment, and, in the case of medical practitioners and pharmacists, revocation of their DEA registration
  • Demand thousands of dollars via wire transfer or in the form of untraceable gift card numbers the victim is told to provide over the phone
  • Ask for personal information, such as social security number or date of birth
  • Reference National Provider Identifier numbers and/or state license numbers when calling a medical practitioner.
  • They also may claim that patients are making accusations against that practitioner.

DEA personnel will never contact members of the public or medical practitioners by telephone to demand money or any other form of payment, will never request personal or sensitive information over the phone, and will only notify people of a legitimate investigation or legal action in person or by official letter.

In fact, no legitimate federal law enforcement officer will demand cash or gift cards from a member of the public.

You should only give money, gift cards, personally identifiable information, including bank account information, to someone you know.

The best deterrence against these bad actors is awareness and caution. Anyone receiving a call from a person claiming to be with DEA should report the incident to the FBI at www.ic3.gov.

The Federal Trade Commission provides recovery steps, shares information with more than 3,000 law enforcement agencies and takes reports at Page 2 reportfraud.ftc.gov.

For any victims who have given personally identifiable information like a social security number to the caller, can learn how to protect against identity theft at www.identitytheft.gov.

Reporting these scam calls will help federal authorities find, arrest, and stop the criminals engaged in this fraud.

Impersonating a federal agent is a violation of federal law, punishable by up to three years in prison aggravated identity theft carries a mandatory minimum sentence of two years in prison plus fines and restitution.


Comments

I have seen this a couple of times. I can tell by their english. One guy, when I asked what he did for a living, he said I sell metal canned food. No salesman in the US would ever say that. This man was supposable from California.

Helen Christiana Terry is a name a scammer has stolen and is using it to extort money from men saying shes a nurse in Nigeria with UNICEF when I contacted UNICEF after she emailed me and I noticed poor english for a nursing student they told me she was a fraud she or whom ever is still using the emails to commit fraud

Please, I think my so called boyfriend is a Nigerian scammer. Someone help me. My heart is to invested. I don't wanna leave him .but I found out he is saying the same thing to other woman. I called him out n he . I need to know y they disappear on the week end please someone any one.

Hello Melanie, I feel what ur going thru, I met someone in EH and his voice didn't match the pic but to find out neither was the pic..in which came clean with but I still believed n him until he asked for my financial support..At that time everything about him I was Leary..I didn't send money and that changed the relationship.He is an African man who lived n LA but was doing "business" n Australia.. Even at time if connecting I tried to do research in him but hit a brick wall..he has a Facebook(I don't) but there is more of story and yes I totally understand how u feel but wanted to say u r not alone..keep ur head up,don't do ANYTHING u don't feel comfortable n doing

I'm so sorry for your pain. These online scammers have no sense of decency. If you notice only one pic or this person escalates his emotions quickly - even before meeting! Then chances are he's a scammer. True love comes from meeting the person face to face, learning about each other in broad daylight - not over the internet!! Don't let yourselves be tricked into thinking these con artists are sincere.

Recently, I was scam by someone from a online dating for money. What do i do? I am lost and don't know how to get out of this situation.

If you gave the scammer your bank or credit card account numbers, contact your bank or credit card company and ask how to protect your accounts.

Please report this to the FTC at ftc.gov/complaint. The details you give will go into a database that law enforcement uses for investigations. If you sent money by wire transfer service, you can report the scammer to the company.

i am tera 22 reporting the name of LT.GEN.BEN HODGES i am talking to him every day and share a sweet words always and he is very sweet man i know a General can be.

he ask me to open an account to transfer money bank to bank a very large amount of money.and i refuse to do it he still talking to and ask to marry him and sending sweet image of heart all the time it sense like a real one

i meet him in accidentally i did not look for him at all the small message start.he give me email that i have been looking in fake email's and i cant till if they are fake because it is very privet and think it's real but i don't think it is.his profile is Government Army please respond the answer mam Bridget Small i need the answer Please..

Your story shows many signs of a scam.

  1. A person you do not know sends a message.
  2. He uses many kind words. Very soon he wants to marry you.
  3. He asks you to open a bank account. He asks you to help him transfer money.

If you open a bank account, you tell the bank your name and your social security number. You will be responsible for the account.

If this is a scam, the man might transfer stolen money into the account. He might ask you to send money to another account. He might ask you to wire the money out of the country. If you do these things, you are helping to commit a crime involving stolen money.

You could tell him you will not open the account. You can stop sending messages if you don't want to talk.

Thank you so very much :Mam: Bridget Small that's i need it to know about i don't have any experience of any of this.your reply is so helpful to me.i thank you

I don't know which dating site u met this General on, but be aware that I have been sent 2-3 friend requests on Tango with this same name. They continuously keep changing his picture. I have never accepted his friend request. Unfortunately I recently fell victim to a romance scam online. These guys say the most beautiful things n tell u they love adore n want to spend the rest of their lives with you. Please don't buy it. They are scammers that do not care about u whatsoever. They will ask u for money. Most of them pose as widowed engineers with a child. They claim to be successful. What a joke. The name of the person who scammed for a little bit of money is name Patrick Nguyen. Not his real name. They will ask u to open bank accts n give them the username password n Q&As. They will try to transfer money into this acct, with ur name on it, via check. Rubber checks that is. Thank God my bank caught the check which had been altered. I called him out on it. Sure he scammed me for money but in the interim I learned a very valuable lesson. He will get u into serious bank fraud problems.

Jenifer , what site are you on ? I also meet a guy online and he asked me to send the money, I did send and now he is disappeared. His name is Philip Nguyen

Im pretty sure this romance scam is happening too me his name is richard lance says hes a sgt stationed in africa hes got 2 kids wife died 2 years ago etc hes nevet asked for money but asked me to send a gift card to his sone i told him no hes basically made me fall in love anywsys he offered to give me money to help with my kids since my health is so bad i ignorantly gave him my login info he tried depositing a check into it but the check is in someone elses name my bank held it saying itd been altered but then said it will be available on the 21st im not exactly sure what to do or if i should say its fraud

If you tell someone your bank account number they can take money out of your account. A scammer might trick you into helping him transfer stolen money. He could ask you to accept a check in your account, and transfer money. If you get involved in a scheme, you could lose money or personal information and get in legal trouble.

Believe me it happened to me.

Has anyone been contacted by Travis Mcguire saying he is a DR in Minnesota?

I have just ran into a love bomber. He was on my Facebook. Last name Mguire. I went for it at first. But if you check closely, they do not use correct English. Do not feel bad about this. It is not your fault! But you may want to put a freeze on your credit unions. Many lonely people get scammed in a "Romance Scam". I did, but I hope they get nothing from me.

I have been scammed for a lot of money , and the sad thing is , I met my scammer on instagram he commented about my dog , this was in july 2020, we started talking every day all day and night, stayed on instagram for awhile , he didn’t seem like the scammer that he ended up to be , he said he worked as a software developer outta Florida , was divorced and only saw his 2 kids on the weekend, we spoke on the phone sent pics even faced timed, then one day in jan 2021, we started talking about me getting myself a new computer and he said you can do great things with your computer , you can learn how to invest and make money on your own money, and I thought oh that sounds nice, I set the whole account on coinbase after a few months he set up a trading accounts for me, I didn’t have to give him any info for this account which I thought was odd but I was so blinded, so he taught me how to transfer my money to the trading account, which ended up to be his account not mine. , This company called siercofx (which I now know is a fake) . I was so stupid , I thought why would someone wait this long to scam someone, right, but yeah he did he scammed me and it hurts yeah, and I’m angry but it’s done. Smh oh his name was Peter Henrik Burke , ig name was __bluebirdpete.

I've got an Ebubu Charles. Military Doctor, moved from Sydney to the US in february. Very fake profile on facebook who have done nothing about his fake profile.

Has anyone been contacted by the name George Richmond? He’s supposedly has 2 daughter one needs surgery and works on oil rig

My scanmmer told me his name was Robert Foster and that he was a construction engineer with a daughter who was home schooled. He lived in California. I live in Florida. These guys are far reaching. I was leery at the beginning because he was talking romance at the very beginning. I thought who does that. He wanted to marry me and had not even met me. After 2 months of texting, he asked me for $300 in ITunes cards. I turned him down. I had already covered myself by saying I lived strictly on my social security. Guess he though he'd get what I had. When I turned him down, I didn't expect him to come back but a few days later, he was back romancing again but in 2 weeks he was asking for the money again. None of these sites really tell you what to do when you discover this. Do you go to the police or someone else? Not sure how to report him. I did a reverse phone search and this guy has 10 addresses in California. He could have 10 people or more doing this kind of thing at each address. There should be something they can do to investigate.

Hello i am talking to a person, he said his name is terry Howell he has a son name leo that goes to school on Turkey. He also ask me to get him 300 in iTunes cards 3 100.00 i didnt do it
Now hes asking me to send his son in Turkey a birthday gift to contact the schooland wire them 1200.for power station 5, he even gave me the schools email

I think the same guy got to me. I got red flags right away when he asked for 300 ITunes cards and called the police. They referred me to an FBI site that had a form. My guy's name was Cedric Chapman. He was "orthopedic surgeon" working for United Nations in Syria and was a widower with a daughter in a Florida boarding school. It appears this is some sort of racket and may be hard for the law to catch with him. Cedric looked to be about 50-55 with a gray goatee type beard. They sometimes steal other's identity, though

I have been talking to a guy who also said the sweetest of things. Even got me to send some him some naughty pictures that he is now blackmailing on saying he will post them on Facebook and send to all my family and friends through the messager also said he tried hacking my work email to send pictures to all my work contacts. He wants $900 and he will delete all my pictures and never contact me again. I'm not sure what to do or where to go about this. He is also saying he will send pictures to my son's school.

I had the same thing happen to me they try to blackmail me too they said they post my picture online it be three months then having done nothing yet they wanted 10,000 dollars I got them block I think was trying to scare me

Hey I’m sorry about that, but you don’t need to be confused because first of all he won’t do it, and I can give you 3 reasons why he can’t,(1) he knows that’s a waste of time to him if he wants to do that and it will cause him problem (2) he is tricking you to believe he has information about you (3) he knows he can be trace if he ever does that and it goes viral or escalate so for that reason he wouldn’t do it, just tell him with a capital letter word GO AHEAD AND DO IT, and see if he will not block and delete you

I needed to read your message. I got scammed big time by a guy I am positive is a Nigerian scammer. as in, I even received a phone call from Nigeria, when I guess they forgot to spoof the number. I had cut off all contact on hangouts and email, but yesterday I got a phone call and then text messages from a number in Illinois. I didn’t answer. and then today I got more texts, listing names of people related to me. He has s pic of me he screenshot. I’m freaking that he might do something with it, but have not replied to anything. What are the odds of him actually doing anything.

There are a number of websites that if you give the scammer enough info, he/she can figure out who you are and these sites will have the names of relatives, your address, cars you have purchased and other information on it. You have to be careful about the info you provide. I know it’s hard and sometimes I have made mistakes.

Hi! I'm curious what name he used. I think I'm being scammed by supposedly a Sgt. in the Army, widowed, Jason White, who is stationed in the Middle East for a few more months. I setup a separate email acct. for this (dating stuff) thinking it's safer (is it?) and have connected some with him via email. I did send a couple pics. Next he wanted to connect better via hookups but won't give me time to connect..just sends a little msg here and there, doesn't respond to my questions. things go blank, which I understand appears to be a scammer. Also, one of his responses included the word "omoge" and I asked him what that was. No response. I googled it and it sounds like it is a term from Nigeria. I don't think I've given any info that he could use, but am concerned about identity theft, etc. Help in knowing what to do/look for and how to find a genuine person.

My uy is calling himself Jack Drowe. I think I am being scammed. My heart is broken.

I think I am being scammed by the same guy. His name is Jack Drowe also.

Hello ladies,we all want to meet someone nice and fall in love ,but how stupid we can be to send information,and most likely money to a person you just meet,wake up this all scams,be smart report them and don’t give out info

Diannese I get that 100%. The heartbreak of finding out someone you liked is a scammer is really hard. These people are gross and will get their karma. I told the FBI about one.

I'll do you all one better! Not only did I get scammed, I got scammed for three years! I met a guy on MeetMe, he was a "Captain" in the Army and was in Afghanistan. He didn't immediately ask me for money. One day, he came on and was in "so much trouble." He had "lost his weapon." He told me he'd be jailed and arrested and that his "Commander" had let soldiers die in jail over there. Suffice to say I got scammed and he even told me that if his "Commander" did not receive the funds that I would be taken to Afghanistan and turned over to the Afghanee men. His "Commander" told me that he had a woman and her family taken over there.
He was extremely convincing. Of course, his "bank account was frozen and he could not access his funds and the payment for this "gun" could not be taken out of his pay." Of course, he was gonna come home. He never came home. In the meantime, I am scared, worried, can't pay all of my bills. I never told anyone, family or friends about this "relationship." Deep down I knew what they would say. A good rule of thumb is if you can't tell your family about someone you're with, there's a BIG problem. It took me a long time to wake up. I decided I was done being in this prison and I freed myself. I cut off ALL contact and I mean ALL. They have been relentlessly calling me and emailing me. It's funny how he couldn't use the phone before but now it's all "they" are doing. I am not acknowledging or responding to any messages. I know it will eventually stop. Last night, I got threatened about a picture I sent, but I am in serious doubt anything will come of that (and trust me, no one wants to see it, lol).
I feel a great weight lifted off of me. I intend to report this. I am not scared. I don't really understand why they are even bothering me. It's not like there aren't 20 more women that this man "loves." I feel like I've just busted out of prison. It will be a very long time before I'll be able to trust anyone again. I am not interested in online dating or any kind of communication apps.
I hope I can help someone by sharing all this and the following:
1. If you are on a message board, FB, whatever and you are messaged by a guy that says he's in the military, RUN! DO NOT message back, do not communicate at all. BLOCK THAT PERSON!
2. DO NOT EVER SEND MONEY, PICS, or VIDEOS to this person.
3. Do not accept cashier's checks or any checks to deposit into your bank account. They like to have money sent to you for you to deposit into your account then they want you to wire, WU, or MG the money to their "agent."
4. These "agents" are the ones getting the money and likely running the scam.
5. You will NEVER and I mean NEVER speak to a true military Commander or General. First, they don't have time and two, they don't care about you or who you are.
6. No one can come get you and take you out of the country. I think about this one now and I just laught. It sounded very convincing at the time.
7. Real soldiers PAY FOR NOTHING, and trust me, if they do, CIVILIANS DO NOT PAY FOR IT.
8. The loss of a military weapon is a BIG DEAL and money doesn't fix that issue.
9. HE is never coming here. He will never come home to you. As a matter of fact, one scam is that the solider is going on leave. Then you get an email saying he has been "detained" for trying to get on a flight with his own weapon (military is allowed to fly with their own weapon).
10. Ask yourself why you have to PAY to be in a relationship? And moreso, how does this soldier have all this time to talk to you?

This is my story. I'm embarrassed that it happened. But it does happen to a lot of people, in every economic situation, culture, men and women. It's not just military romance scams, it's all kinds. Depending on the situation, whether out of loneliness, mourning, or other vulnerability you weren't paying attention. The important thing is to pay attention, and if you are caught up in it, release yourself. Don't allow yourself to be used and abused anymore.

I hope this helps someone.

I have been scanned royalty for about a month. The first guy named Dennis Freeman was from Beverly Hills but in Turkey doing oil drilling. The Turkish government needed him to pay $30,000 in taxes and he wanted me to access his online banking information, which I refused to do. Then he asked me for the money. Ok, stopped talking to him.
Then came James Luck, 4 star in the army. Many videos and signs with I love you, Janet. Fell for him hard. He started to ask for STEAM cards which I had no idea what they were. Walmart told me it was as scam and only would sell me $40 then I went to Target and got another $150. He wanted originally $300. Still asking for them or a credit card so he can "add" money to my account.
At the another time, a Turkish neurosurgeon. I asked for a picture (selfie) he asked who I was talking to. He tried to get in to my Spectrum account to order Iphone ipods, , IPads., for his son and himself. Son was sending me messages oh "WhatsApp " telling me how happy good dad was and that he loved me and wanted to call need "mummy". omg to use your children.
The last guy manipulated me in giving him my address and having a check for $585,000 sent to my house. He has my address!! OMG. Was talking about Turkish government waving taxes due $196,000. He said he had $42.100 with him and could I help him please. you know how much I love you..ya da ya da ya da. I said NO. he called me screaming on the phone and saying gore could you chance like this!! Blaming me for everything.
I asked for an address to send back the check. I insisted on certified, registered letter. He didn't want to do that!! I insisted and got it mailed this morning. I have reported this!!
Yes, I'm scared as he knows my address!! But hopefully he won't bother me anymore!! I'm keeping good information online right now as proof in case anything comes of this.
Please ladies, don't be conned!! Be smart!! We shouldn't ever think were desperate!!

I think I have been scanned by the same guy, he said that his name was Nelson Scott, oringinally from Florida, living currently in Zürich, Switzerland. We met at Tinder - I am German. He told me that he was a widower and childless and that after the death of his wife he lived with his mother (Swiss nationality) in Switzerland until she passed away. Now he was all alone in the world. He said he wanted to celebrate christmans with me and my kids, but he had to go to Turkey on a business trip for 8 days. He told me that he would retire after this job.
doing some oil drillings there lol. After 3 days in Turkey he told me that he has big problems and he asked me to send him over 2 computers, because the once he was using there could not cope making the analysis correctly. I did some research and found out that he was using the pictures of another person. Also his cell was located in Germany and not in Turkey, so I stopped communicating with him. He probably recorded the person whose pictures he used to introduce himself on Tinder during a svideocalls The conncetion was very bad, so I did not realize that their could be something wrong. At that time I did not doubt and believed that it was just the bad connection. This experience indicates that he most probably is working with a women partner - recording people with whom they chat. I have sent him several pictures of me via Whatsapp and also my address. does anyone have experience and could recommand me what to do here?
Thanks for anybodys advise.


Scammers impersonating Drug Enforcement Agents are stealing identities and money

LANSING, Mich. (WLNS) — The Drug Enforcement Administration is warning people to be on the lookout for a widespread fraud scheme in which telephone scammers impersonate DEA agents in an attempt to extort money or steal personal identifiable information.

A new public service announcement aims to raise awareness that DEA will never phone demanding
money or asking for personal information.

There are variations in the false narrative, among them, that the target’s name was used to rent a vehicle that was stopped at the border and contained a large number of drugs.

The caller then has the target verify their social security number or tells the target their bank account has been compromised.

In some cases, the caller threatens the target with arrest for the fictional drug seizure and instructs the person, over the phone, to send money via gift card or wire transfer to pay a “fine” or to assist with the investigation or with resetting the bank account.

A portion of an actual scam call was captured by DEA and can be heard here.
“Our office receives 3 – 5 calls a month from people all over the country, often moments after they have gotten off the phone with these con artists,” said Detroit Field Division Special Agent in Charge Keith Martin in a press release.

“DEA personnel will never contact members of the public or medical practitioners by telephone to demand money or any other form of payment.

“DEA will never request personal or sensitive information over the phone, and will only notify people of a legitimate investigation or legal action in person or by official letter. In fact, no legitimate federal law enforcement officer will demand cash or gift cards from a member of the public.”

Employing more sophisticated tactics, Schemers have spoofed legitimate DEA phone numbers to convince their target that the call is legitimate, or texted photos of what appears to be a legitimate law enforcement credential with a photo.

The reported scam tactics continually change but often share many of the same characteristics.
Callers use fake names and badge numbers as well as names of well-known DEA officials or police officers in local departments.

Additionally, they may:
• use an urgent and aggressive tone, refusing to speak to or leave a message with anyone other than their targeted victim
• threaten arrest, prosecution, imprisonment, and, in the case of medical practitioners and pharmacists, revocation of their DEA registration
• demand thousands of dollars via wire transfer or in the form of untraceable gift card numbers the victim is told to provide over the phone
• ask for personal information, such as social security number or date of birth
Page 2
• reference National Provider Identifier numbers and/or state license numbers when calling a medical practitioner.

They also may claim that patients are making accusations against that practitioner.
The best deterrence against these bad actors is awareness and caution. Anyone receiving a call from a person claiming to be with DEA should report the incident to the FBI at www.ic3.gov.

The Federal Trade Commission provides recovery steps, shares information with more than 3,000 law enforcement agencies and takes reports at reportfraud.ftc.gov.

For any victims who have given personally identifiable information like a social security
number to the caller, can learn how to protect against identity theft at www.identitytheft.gov.

Reporting these scam calls will help federal authorities find, arrest, and stop the criminals engaged in this fraud.

Impersonating a federal agent is a violation of federal law, punishable by up to three years in prison aggravated identity theft carries a mandatory minimum sentence of two years in prison plus fines and restitution.

Copyright 2021 Nexstar Media Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


News on counterfeit medicines

If you believe you have a counterfeit medicine, talk to the pharmacist where you bought the medicine or contact your health care professional for medical advice.

After your safety is assured, FDA needs your help in protecting the safety of others. FDA relies on the voluntary reporting of suspect counterfeit drugs from consumers, health care professionals and other drug supply chain partners to ensure that only safe and effective drugs are available on the market.

FDA asks health care professionals to report a suspect counterfeit drug to FDA’s MedWatch office. Contact FDA's Office of Criminal Investigations if you are aware of suspicious activity that may be associated with counterfeit prescription drugs.

If you find a website you think is illegally selling human drugs, animal drugs, medical devices, biological products, foods, dietary supplements or cosmetics, please follow one of the three options below to report to FDA. If your report:


ALERT - Extortion Scam

The Drug Enforcement Administration is warning the public, to include the DEA registrant community, of a widespread fraud scheme in which scammers impersonate DEA agents in an attempt to extort money or steal personal identifiable information.

DEA personnel will never contact members of the public or medical practitioners to demand money or any other form of payment, will never request personal or sensitive information, and will only notify people of a legitimate investigation or legal action in person or by official letter. In fact, no legitimate federal law enforcement officer will demand cash or gift cards from a member of the public. You should only give money, gift cards, personally identifiable information, including bank account information, to someone you know.

Anyone receiving a fraudulent call or email of this nature, from a person claiming to be with DEA or another law enforcement agency, is encouraged to file a complaint with the FBI and The Federal Trade Commission.


Watch the video: Επί ποδός τα τμήματα τροχαίας σε ολόκληρη την Κρήτη (October 2021).