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Thomas Keller Loves In-N-Out, Quiches

Thomas Keller Loves In-N-Out, Quiches

Plus, he explains how your roast chicken could be better

In a recent GQ article, The French Laundry’s Thomas Keller spills the beans on his favorite food film scene and his secret to good fries at In-N-Out. We’ve rounded up the best bits here.

On Roast Chicken: “Probably the one thing I see that happens with roast chicken more often than not is that we don't dry out our birds well enough.... You see in professional kitchens or butcher's shops where the skin becomes a little dark — it's that dryness you need.”

On In-N-Out’s Success: “In our society today, everyone is looking for what is the newest trend. In-N-Out has never been that guy.”

And On Ordering Their Fries: “You have to really order them well-done to get them crispy because with french fries, the technique is that you have to fry them twice.… Those are little nuances that you learn.”

On His Favorite Food Flick: “The scene in Goodfellas where they're all in jail making the pasta. One of the mobsters Paulie is slicing the garlic with a razor blade and he talks about how important it is to make it thin.”

On Real Men and Quiches (His Favorite Canapé): “Real men don't eat quiche, do they?”

The Daily Byte is a regular column dedicated to covering interesting food news and trends across the country. Click here for previous columns.


5 Secrets to Making the Perfect Quiche

Pour one out for quiche, that glossy-magazine hero of 25 years ago, that today is treated more like a punchline than a recipe. “I’m making quiche!,” someone says. And we all gather around and ask if there will be fig and goat cheese salad with raspberry vinaigrette too, and sundried tomatoes, just in a bowl somewhere, because they have to be on the table. Quiche, you work so hard for us, and we respect you so little.

There is a #brunchgoals tag on Instagram from which quiche is almost wholly absent. Imagine yourself as an alien that has never tasted quiche, and when you asked what it was, you were told it is egg pie, and your survey of the internet from your starship confirmed that Instagram literally thrives on photos of eggs and pies and mash-ups of one food and another food. The discontinuity would strike you as ludicrous. How is quiche not the most brunchy-brunch dish in anyone’s repertoire?

It all makes sense, though, when you consider that the average quiche is, quite frankly, worthy of derision: more an ovoid substrate for meat and vegetable fillings in a wishy-washy crust than a custardy, indulgent item of substance. Quiche, our magazine-skimming consciences and Instagram-conversant alien visitors tell us, deserves more.

Enter Avery Ruzicka, the softspoken but brilliant baker behind Manresa Bread, a new extension of David Kinch’s iconic Los Gatos, California restaurant. There she makes exquisite crackly croissants and baguettes so beautifully burnished they don’t even need butter. But she also makes quiche—a stupendous one, creamy as a panna cotta in a crust so buttery and flavorful it’d bring a tear to a Midwestern grandmother’s eye. The custard is full of cheese and the crust is loaded with nutty whole grains and not a square millimeter of the eggy mass is overcooked or weepy. It’s a quiche to rival Thomas Keller’s at Bouchon.

So when Ruzicka came to visit the SAVEUR test kitchen, all we could ask her was how, and her response, in true understated Ruzicka fashion, was simple: That’s how they tasted in France when she traveled there. And that’s what she tried to replicate back in California.

The real story, it turns out, is a little more complicated. In showing us how she made her Quiche Cooligan 1 , she revealed some nuggets of insight beyond the standard French playbook—baking know-how to apply to her recipe or any other quiche. Here are five ways to give quiche the justice it deserves.


5 Secrets to Making the Perfect Quiche

Pour one out for quiche, that glossy-magazine hero of 25 years ago, that today is treated more like a punchline than a recipe. “I’m making quiche!,” someone says. And we all gather around and ask if there will be fig and goat cheese salad with raspberry vinaigrette too, and sundried tomatoes, just in a bowl somewhere, because they have to be on the table. Quiche, you work so hard for us, and we respect you so little.

There is a #brunchgoals tag on Instagram from which quiche is almost wholly absent. Imagine yourself as an alien that has never tasted quiche, and when you asked what it was, you were told it is egg pie, and your survey of the internet from your starship confirmed that Instagram literally thrives on photos of eggs and pies and mash-ups of one food and another food. The discontinuity would strike you as ludicrous. How is quiche not the most brunchy-brunch dish in anyone’s repertoire?

It all makes sense, though, when you consider that the average quiche is, quite frankly, worthy of derision: more an ovoid substrate for meat and vegetable fillings in a wishy-washy crust than a custardy, indulgent item of substance. Quiche, our magazine-skimming consciences and Instagram-conversant alien visitors tell us, deserves more.

Enter Avery Ruzicka, the softspoken but brilliant baker behind Manresa Bread, a new extension of David Kinch’s iconic Los Gatos, California restaurant. There she makes exquisite crackly croissants and baguettes so beautifully burnished they don’t even need butter. But she also makes quiche—a stupendous one, creamy as a panna cotta in a crust so buttery and flavorful it’d bring a tear to a Midwestern grandmother’s eye. The custard is full of cheese and the crust is loaded with nutty whole grains and not a square millimeter of the eggy mass is overcooked or weepy. It’s a quiche to rival Thomas Keller’s at Bouchon.

So when Ruzicka came to visit the SAVEUR test kitchen, all we could ask her was how, and her response, in true understated Ruzicka fashion, was simple: That’s how they tasted in France when she traveled there. And that’s what she tried to replicate back in California.

The real story, it turns out, is a little more complicated. In showing us how she made her Quiche Cooligan 1 , she revealed some nuggets of insight beyond the standard French playbook—baking know-how to apply to her recipe or any other quiche. Here are five ways to give quiche the justice it deserves.


5 Secrets to Making the Perfect Quiche

Pour one out for quiche, that glossy-magazine hero of 25 years ago, that today is treated more like a punchline than a recipe. “I’m making quiche!,” someone says. And we all gather around and ask if there will be fig and goat cheese salad with raspberry vinaigrette too, and sundried tomatoes, just in a bowl somewhere, because they have to be on the table. Quiche, you work so hard for us, and we respect you so little.

There is a #brunchgoals tag on Instagram from which quiche is almost wholly absent. Imagine yourself as an alien that has never tasted quiche, and when you asked what it was, you were told it is egg pie, and your survey of the internet from your starship confirmed that Instagram literally thrives on photos of eggs and pies and mash-ups of one food and another food. The discontinuity would strike you as ludicrous. How is quiche not the most brunchy-brunch dish in anyone’s repertoire?

It all makes sense, though, when you consider that the average quiche is, quite frankly, worthy of derision: more an ovoid substrate for meat and vegetable fillings in a wishy-washy crust than a custardy, indulgent item of substance. Quiche, our magazine-skimming consciences and Instagram-conversant alien visitors tell us, deserves more.

Enter Avery Ruzicka, the softspoken but brilliant baker behind Manresa Bread, a new extension of David Kinch’s iconic Los Gatos, California restaurant. There she makes exquisite crackly croissants and baguettes so beautifully burnished they don’t even need butter. But she also makes quiche—a stupendous one, creamy as a panna cotta in a crust so buttery and flavorful it’d bring a tear to a Midwestern grandmother’s eye. The custard is full of cheese and the crust is loaded with nutty whole grains and not a square millimeter of the eggy mass is overcooked or weepy. It’s a quiche to rival Thomas Keller’s at Bouchon.

So when Ruzicka came to visit the SAVEUR test kitchen, all we could ask her was how, and her response, in true understated Ruzicka fashion, was simple: That’s how they tasted in France when she traveled there. And that’s what she tried to replicate back in California.

The real story, it turns out, is a little more complicated. In showing us how she made her Quiche Cooligan 1 , she revealed some nuggets of insight beyond the standard French playbook—baking know-how to apply to her recipe or any other quiche. Here are five ways to give quiche the justice it deserves.


5 Secrets to Making the Perfect Quiche

Pour one out for quiche, that glossy-magazine hero of 25 years ago, that today is treated more like a punchline than a recipe. “I’m making quiche!,” someone says. And we all gather around and ask if there will be fig and goat cheese salad with raspberry vinaigrette too, and sundried tomatoes, just in a bowl somewhere, because they have to be on the table. Quiche, you work so hard for us, and we respect you so little.

There is a #brunchgoals tag on Instagram from which quiche is almost wholly absent. Imagine yourself as an alien that has never tasted quiche, and when you asked what it was, you were told it is egg pie, and your survey of the internet from your starship confirmed that Instagram literally thrives on photos of eggs and pies and mash-ups of one food and another food. The discontinuity would strike you as ludicrous. How is quiche not the most brunchy-brunch dish in anyone’s repertoire?

It all makes sense, though, when you consider that the average quiche is, quite frankly, worthy of derision: more an ovoid substrate for meat and vegetable fillings in a wishy-washy crust than a custardy, indulgent item of substance. Quiche, our magazine-skimming consciences and Instagram-conversant alien visitors tell us, deserves more.

Enter Avery Ruzicka, the softspoken but brilliant baker behind Manresa Bread, a new extension of David Kinch’s iconic Los Gatos, California restaurant. There she makes exquisite crackly croissants and baguettes so beautifully burnished they don’t even need butter. But she also makes quiche—a stupendous one, creamy as a panna cotta in a crust so buttery and flavorful it’d bring a tear to a Midwestern grandmother’s eye. The custard is full of cheese and the crust is loaded with nutty whole grains and not a square millimeter of the eggy mass is overcooked or weepy. It’s a quiche to rival Thomas Keller’s at Bouchon.

So when Ruzicka came to visit the SAVEUR test kitchen, all we could ask her was how, and her response, in true understated Ruzicka fashion, was simple: That’s how they tasted in France when she traveled there. And that’s what she tried to replicate back in California.

The real story, it turns out, is a little more complicated. In showing us how she made her Quiche Cooligan 1 , she revealed some nuggets of insight beyond the standard French playbook—baking know-how to apply to her recipe or any other quiche. Here are five ways to give quiche the justice it deserves.


5 Secrets to Making the Perfect Quiche

Pour one out for quiche, that glossy-magazine hero of 25 years ago, that today is treated more like a punchline than a recipe. “I’m making quiche!,” someone says. And we all gather around and ask if there will be fig and goat cheese salad with raspberry vinaigrette too, and sundried tomatoes, just in a bowl somewhere, because they have to be on the table. Quiche, you work so hard for us, and we respect you so little.

There is a #brunchgoals tag on Instagram from which quiche is almost wholly absent. Imagine yourself as an alien that has never tasted quiche, and when you asked what it was, you were told it is egg pie, and your survey of the internet from your starship confirmed that Instagram literally thrives on photos of eggs and pies and mash-ups of one food and another food. The discontinuity would strike you as ludicrous. How is quiche not the most brunchy-brunch dish in anyone’s repertoire?

It all makes sense, though, when you consider that the average quiche is, quite frankly, worthy of derision: more an ovoid substrate for meat and vegetable fillings in a wishy-washy crust than a custardy, indulgent item of substance. Quiche, our magazine-skimming consciences and Instagram-conversant alien visitors tell us, deserves more.

Enter Avery Ruzicka, the softspoken but brilliant baker behind Manresa Bread, a new extension of David Kinch’s iconic Los Gatos, California restaurant. There she makes exquisite crackly croissants and baguettes so beautifully burnished they don’t even need butter. But she also makes quiche—a stupendous one, creamy as a panna cotta in a crust so buttery and flavorful it’d bring a tear to a Midwestern grandmother’s eye. The custard is full of cheese and the crust is loaded with nutty whole grains and not a square millimeter of the eggy mass is overcooked or weepy. It’s a quiche to rival Thomas Keller’s at Bouchon.

So when Ruzicka came to visit the SAVEUR test kitchen, all we could ask her was how, and her response, in true understated Ruzicka fashion, was simple: That’s how they tasted in France when she traveled there. And that’s what she tried to replicate back in California.

The real story, it turns out, is a little more complicated. In showing us how she made her Quiche Cooligan 1 , she revealed some nuggets of insight beyond the standard French playbook—baking know-how to apply to her recipe or any other quiche. Here are five ways to give quiche the justice it deserves.


5 Secrets to Making the Perfect Quiche

Pour one out for quiche, that glossy-magazine hero of 25 years ago, that today is treated more like a punchline than a recipe. “I’m making quiche!,” someone says. And we all gather around and ask if there will be fig and goat cheese salad with raspberry vinaigrette too, and sundried tomatoes, just in a bowl somewhere, because they have to be on the table. Quiche, you work so hard for us, and we respect you so little.

There is a #brunchgoals tag on Instagram from which quiche is almost wholly absent. Imagine yourself as an alien that has never tasted quiche, and when you asked what it was, you were told it is egg pie, and your survey of the internet from your starship confirmed that Instagram literally thrives on photos of eggs and pies and mash-ups of one food and another food. The discontinuity would strike you as ludicrous. How is quiche not the most brunchy-brunch dish in anyone’s repertoire?

It all makes sense, though, when you consider that the average quiche is, quite frankly, worthy of derision: more an ovoid substrate for meat and vegetable fillings in a wishy-washy crust than a custardy, indulgent item of substance. Quiche, our magazine-skimming consciences and Instagram-conversant alien visitors tell us, deserves more.

Enter Avery Ruzicka, the softspoken but brilliant baker behind Manresa Bread, a new extension of David Kinch’s iconic Los Gatos, California restaurant. There she makes exquisite crackly croissants and baguettes so beautifully burnished they don’t even need butter. But she also makes quiche—a stupendous one, creamy as a panna cotta in a crust so buttery and flavorful it’d bring a tear to a Midwestern grandmother’s eye. The custard is full of cheese and the crust is loaded with nutty whole grains and not a square millimeter of the eggy mass is overcooked or weepy. It’s a quiche to rival Thomas Keller’s at Bouchon.

So when Ruzicka came to visit the SAVEUR test kitchen, all we could ask her was how, and her response, in true understated Ruzicka fashion, was simple: That’s how they tasted in France when she traveled there. And that’s what she tried to replicate back in California.

The real story, it turns out, is a little more complicated. In showing us how she made her Quiche Cooligan 1 , she revealed some nuggets of insight beyond the standard French playbook—baking know-how to apply to her recipe or any other quiche. Here are five ways to give quiche the justice it deserves.


5 Secrets to Making the Perfect Quiche

Pour one out for quiche, that glossy-magazine hero of 25 years ago, that today is treated more like a punchline than a recipe. “I’m making quiche!,” someone says. And we all gather around and ask if there will be fig and goat cheese salad with raspberry vinaigrette too, and sundried tomatoes, just in a bowl somewhere, because they have to be on the table. Quiche, you work so hard for us, and we respect you so little.

There is a #brunchgoals tag on Instagram from which quiche is almost wholly absent. Imagine yourself as an alien that has never tasted quiche, and when you asked what it was, you were told it is egg pie, and your survey of the internet from your starship confirmed that Instagram literally thrives on photos of eggs and pies and mash-ups of one food and another food. The discontinuity would strike you as ludicrous. How is quiche not the most brunchy-brunch dish in anyone’s repertoire?

It all makes sense, though, when you consider that the average quiche is, quite frankly, worthy of derision: more an ovoid substrate for meat and vegetable fillings in a wishy-washy crust than a custardy, indulgent item of substance. Quiche, our magazine-skimming consciences and Instagram-conversant alien visitors tell us, deserves more.

Enter Avery Ruzicka, the softspoken but brilliant baker behind Manresa Bread, a new extension of David Kinch’s iconic Los Gatos, California restaurant. There she makes exquisite crackly croissants and baguettes so beautifully burnished they don’t even need butter. But she also makes quiche—a stupendous one, creamy as a panna cotta in a crust so buttery and flavorful it’d bring a tear to a Midwestern grandmother’s eye. The custard is full of cheese and the crust is loaded with nutty whole grains and not a square millimeter of the eggy mass is overcooked or weepy. It’s a quiche to rival Thomas Keller’s at Bouchon.

So when Ruzicka came to visit the SAVEUR test kitchen, all we could ask her was how, and her response, in true understated Ruzicka fashion, was simple: That’s how they tasted in France when she traveled there. And that’s what she tried to replicate back in California.

The real story, it turns out, is a little more complicated. In showing us how she made her Quiche Cooligan 1 , she revealed some nuggets of insight beyond the standard French playbook—baking know-how to apply to her recipe or any other quiche. Here are five ways to give quiche the justice it deserves.


5 Secrets to Making the Perfect Quiche

Pour one out for quiche, that glossy-magazine hero of 25 years ago, that today is treated more like a punchline than a recipe. “I’m making quiche!,” someone says. And we all gather around and ask if there will be fig and goat cheese salad with raspberry vinaigrette too, and sundried tomatoes, just in a bowl somewhere, because they have to be on the table. Quiche, you work so hard for us, and we respect you so little.

There is a #brunchgoals tag on Instagram from which quiche is almost wholly absent. Imagine yourself as an alien that has never tasted quiche, and when you asked what it was, you were told it is egg pie, and your survey of the internet from your starship confirmed that Instagram literally thrives on photos of eggs and pies and mash-ups of one food and another food. The discontinuity would strike you as ludicrous. How is quiche not the most brunchy-brunch dish in anyone’s repertoire?

It all makes sense, though, when you consider that the average quiche is, quite frankly, worthy of derision: more an ovoid substrate for meat and vegetable fillings in a wishy-washy crust than a custardy, indulgent item of substance. Quiche, our magazine-skimming consciences and Instagram-conversant alien visitors tell us, deserves more.

Enter Avery Ruzicka, the softspoken but brilliant baker behind Manresa Bread, a new extension of David Kinch’s iconic Los Gatos, California restaurant. There she makes exquisite crackly croissants and baguettes so beautifully burnished they don’t even need butter. But she also makes quiche—a stupendous one, creamy as a panna cotta in a crust so buttery and flavorful it’d bring a tear to a Midwestern grandmother’s eye. The custard is full of cheese and the crust is loaded with nutty whole grains and not a square millimeter of the eggy mass is overcooked or weepy. It’s a quiche to rival Thomas Keller’s at Bouchon.

So when Ruzicka came to visit the SAVEUR test kitchen, all we could ask her was how, and her response, in true understated Ruzicka fashion, was simple: That’s how they tasted in France when she traveled there. And that’s what she tried to replicate back in California.

The real story, it turns out, is a little more complicated. In showing us how she made her Quiche Cooligan 1 , she revealed some nuggets of insight beyond the standard French playbook—baking know-how to apply to her recipe or any other quiche. Here are five ways to give quiche the justice it deserves.


5 Secrets to Making the Perfect Quiche

Pour one out for quiche, that glossy-magazine hero of 25 years ago, that today is treated more like a punchline than a recipe. “I’m making quiche!,” someone says. And we all gather around and ask if there will be fig and goat cheese salad with raspberry vinaigrette too, and sundried tomatoes, just in a bowl somewhere, because they have to be on the table. Quiche, you work so hard for us, and we respect you so little.

There is a #brunchgoals tag on Instagram from which quiche is almost wholly absent. Imagine yourself as an alien that has never tasted quiche, and when you asked what it was, you were told it is egg pie, and your survey of the internet from your starship confirmed that Instagram literally thrives on photos of eggs and pies and mash-ups of one food and another food. The discontinuity would strike you as ludicrous. How is quiche not the most brunchy-brunch dish in anyone’s repertoire?

It all makes sense, though, when you consider that the average quiche is, quite frankly, worthy of derision: more an ovoid substrate for meat and vegetable fillings in a wishy-washy crust than a custardy, indulgent item of substance. Quiche, our magazine-skimming consciences and Instagram-conversant alien visitors tell us, deserves more.

Enter Avery Ruzicka, the softspoken but brilliant baker behind Manresa Bread, a new extension of David Kinch’s iconic Los Gatos, California restaurant. There she makes exquisite crackly croissants and baguettes so beautifully burnished they don’t even need butter. But she also makes quiche—a stupendous one, creamy as a panna cotta in a crust so buttery and flavorful it’d bring a tear to a Midwestern grandmother’s eye. The custard is full of cheese and the crust is loaded with nutty whole grains and not a square millimeter of the eggy mass is overcooked or weepy. It’s a quiche to rival Thomas Keller’s at Bouchon.

So when Ruzicka came to visit the SAVEUR test kitchen, all we could ask her was how, and her response, in true understated Ruzicka fashion, was simple: That’s how they tasted in France when she traveled there. And that’s what she tried to replicate back in California.

The real story, it turns out, is a little more complicated. In showing us how she made her Quiche Cooligan 1 , she revealed some nuggets of insight beyond the standard French playbook—baking know-how to apply to her recipe or any other quiche. Here are five ways to give quiche the justice it deserves.


5 Secrets to Making the Perfect Quiche

Pour one out for quiche, that glossy-magazine hero of 25 years ago, that today is treated more like a punchline than a recipe. “I’m making quiche!,” someone says. And we all gather around and ask if there will be fig and goat cheese salad with raspberry vinaigrette too, and sundried tomatoes, just in a bowl somewhere, because they have to be on the table. Quiche, you work so hard for us, and we respect you so little.

There is a #brunchgoals tag on Instagram from which quiche is almost wholly absent. Imagine yourself as an alien that has never tasted quiche, and when you asked what it was, you were told it is egg pie, and your survey of the internet from your starship confirmed that Instagram literally thrives on photos of eggs and pies and mash-ups of one food and another food. The discontinuity would strike you as ludicrous. How is quiche not the most brunchy-brunch dish in anyone’s repertoire?

It all makes sense, though, when you consider that the average quiche is, quite frankly, worthy of derision: more an ovoid substrate for meat and vegetable fillings in a wishy-washy crust than a custardy, indulgent item of substance. Quiche, our magazine-skimming consciences and Instagram-conversant alien visitors tell us, deserves more.

Enter Avery Ruzicka, the softspoken but brilliant baker behind Manresa Bread, a new extension of David Kinch’s iconic Los Gatos, California restaurant. There she makes exquisite crackly croissants and baguettes so beautifully burnished they don’t even need butter. But she also makes quiche—a stupendous one, creamy as a panna cotta in a crust so buttery and flavorful it’d bring a tear to a Midwestern grandmother’s eye. The custard is full of cheese and the crust is loaded with nutty whole grains and not a square millimeter of the eggy mass is overcooked or weepy. It’s a quiche to rival Thomas Keller’s at Bouchon.

So when Ruzicka came to visit the SAVEUR test kitchen, all we could ask her was how, and her response, in true understated Ruzicka fashion, was simple: That’s how they tasted in France when she traveled there. And that’s what she tried to replicate back in California.

The real story, it turns out, is a little more complicated. In showing us how she made her Quiche Cooligan 1 , she revealed some nuggets of insight beyond the standard French playbook—baking know-how to apply to her recipe or any other quiche. Here are five ways to give quiche the justice it deserves.


Watch the video: Anthony Bourdain on In-N-Out: My Favorite Restaurant in LA (December 2021).