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Pepsi-Co CEO Among 50 Most Powerful Women in Business

Pepsi-Co CEO Among 50 Most Powerful Women in Business

Pepsi-Co CEO Among 50 Most Powerful Women in Business

Forbes just announced its annual list of the 50 Most Powerful Women in Business, and the top 10 include Indra Nooyi, the CEO of Pepsi-Co (at number three), and Pat Woertz, the CEO of Archer Daniels Midland, a food processing and agricultural company (at number eight).

Pepsi-Co’s products go beyond soft drinks. Several of their products were included this year in the best new products Forbes list, including Starbucks, Muller Quaker Yogurt, and Mountain Dew Kickstart, thanks to Nooyi’s efforts. Pepsi-Co’s profits have risen 72 percent under her leadership since she became CEO in 2006.

You may not have heard of Archer Daniels Midland, but you’ve probably eaten their food. ADM supplies many of the ingredients that go into manufactured food products the world over, like sweeteners, starches, meat casings, and other processed products. Woertz, CEO since 2006, has pushed the company to diversify.

The most powerful woman in business is Ginni Rometty, CEO of IBM, according to Forbes.

For the latest happenings in the food and drink world, visit our Food News page.

Joanna Fantozzi is an Associate Editor with The Daily Meal. Follow her on Twitter@JoannaFantozzi


PepsiCo

PepsiCo, Inc. is an American multinational food, snack, and beverage corporation headquartered in Harrison, New York, in the hamlet of Purchase. PepsiCo has interests in the manufacturing, marketing, and distribution of grain-based snack foods, beverages, and other products. PepsiCo was formed in 1965 with the merger of the Pepsi-Cola Company and Frito-Lay, Inc. PepsiCo has since expanded from its namesake product Pepsi to a broader range of food and beverage brands, the largest of which included an acquisition of Tropicana Products in 1998 and the Quaker Oats Company in 2001, which added the Gatorade brand to its portfolio.

As of January 26, 2012, 22 of PepsiCo's brands generated retail sales of more than $1 billion, [2] and the company's products were distributed across more than 200 countries, resulting in annual net revenues of $43.3 billion. Based on net revenue, PepsiCo is the second-largest food and beverage business in the world, behind Nestlé. Historically the main competition of Pepsi's beverage brands was Coca-Cola. Within North America, PepsiCo is the largest food and beverage business by net revenue. Ramon Laguarta has been the chief executive of PepsiCo since 2018. The company's beverage distribution and bottling is conducted by PepsiCo as well as by licensed bottlers in certain regions.

Pepsi has been repeatedly criticized by environmentalists for its relationship to negative environmental impacts of agriculture in its supply chain, such as palm oil-related deforestation and pesticide use, its use of water resources, and the negative impacts of its packaging -- Pepsi's packaging has consistently been one of the top sources of plastic pollution globally. [3] Similarly public health advocates have criticized Pepsi's high-calorie, poor nutrition product lines along with other popular snack and drink manufacturers. In response, Pepsi has made public commitments to change many of these practices.


Diversity & Engagement

At PepsiCo, we recognize that supporting diversity and engagement is not only the right thing to do, it is the right thing to do for our business. This commitment is woven into our values and our guiding philosophy of Winning with Purpose vision, which recognizes that our company is strongest when we are a company of opportunity that embraces the full spectrum of humanity. That means both building a more diverse, more inclusive workplace, and promoting what we call courageous engagement in our company and the communities we serve.

PepsiCo&rsquos commitment to Diversity & Engagement comes to life in the 2018 Diversity Report: PepsiCo&rsquos Position. The report highlights examples and initiatives that advance diversity.

We&rsquore committed to increasing our diversity and have set a global goal to reach gender parity in management roles by 2025.

PepsiCo has a strong legacy of leading in diversity practices, starting in the 1940s as a pioneer in hiring African American salespeople, in the 50s as among the first major companies to have a woman on our Board, and into the 80s as a vanguard of multicultural marketing. Together, with their different perspectives, experiences, and backgrounds, our people are building on this legacy and creating our future across the more than 200 countries and territories in which we operate. Since 2016, we have made external commitments around gender parity, pay equity, and prosperity for all our communities, and each year we continue to celebrate our champions of diversity and inclusion with the Harvey C. Russell and Steve Reinemund Awards.

PepsiCo leverages diversity and engagement as a competitive business advantage that fuels innovation, strengthens our reputation, and fosters engagement with employees and members of the communities in which we do business. We strive to improve the attraction, retention, and advancement of global and diverse talent to ensure we sustain a high-calibur pipeline, and have set a target to reach gender parity in management roles by 2025.

To guide us on this journey, PepsiCo is an endorser of the United Nations Women&rsquos Empowerment Principles&ndashEquality Means Business. The Principles offer insight to companies with regard to empowering women in the workplace, marketplace and community.

We are also proud to be part of Catalyst, CEO Champions for Change. This group includes more than 50 high-profile CEOs publicly pledging to advance more women and women of color into senior leadership positions and onto their boards.

At PepsiCo, we encourage our associates to courageously engage and drive change. Whether that&rsquos standing up and speaking out, sharing opinions or experiences, or creating an environment conducive to dialogue.

Our associates are invited to participate in employee resource groups (ERGs) to help drive a culture of diversity, inclusion and engagement. We support their collective efforts by telling their stories, including events such as the celebration of International Women&rsquos Day by our Women&rsquos Inclusion Network, events around Pride Month led by EQUAL, our group for LGBT+ employees and allies, to the inspiring work of MOSAIC, our ERG for Black associates, through celebrating Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day and Black History Month events in the U.S.

We have also taken the CEO action pledge, which is supporting a more inclusive workplace for employees, communities, and society at large.

PepsiCo is partnering with the PepsiCo Foundation to support environmental, educational and nutritional initiatives to spur prosperity in communities near where our employees live and work. Our efforts include working to invest USD 100MM in initiatives that will benefit at least 12.5MM women and girls around the world by 2025, with a focus on helping 1.5MM young women progress through school and be successful in the workforce.

An important focus of the Foundation's work is providing skills training and support services that allow women and girls to be able to increase their earnings potential, which benefits not just women but also their families and local communities. We are particularly focused on initiatives that support women in agriculture, including our groundbreaking effort to close the Crop Gap by helping women farmers gain access to the same resources as men.

PepsiCo was built on the foundation that we thrive because of our diversity and we can take steps together to advance to a more united, equitable and inclusive workplace and world. Last year, PepsiCo announced our Racial Equality Journey (REJ) Initiative&mdashinvesting more than $500 million dollars over the next five-years with a focus on three pillars: People, Business and Communities. For people, we are focused on increasing Black and Hispanic representation at PepsiCo through recruitment, education, internships, and apprenticeships. For businesses, we are leveraging our scale and influence across suppliers and strategic partners to increase Black and Hispanic representation and elevate diverse voices. And for our communities, we&rsquore working to drive long-term change by addressing systemic barriers to economic opportunity and advancing economic empowerment for Black and Hispanic Americans.

Black Initiative

PepsiCo&rsquos Racial Equality Journey Black Initiative is an investment of $400+ million over five years to uplift Black business and communities, and increase Black representation at PepsiCo. Learn more about our Racial Equality Journey Black Initiative and our People, Business and Community approach.

Hispanic Initiative

PepsiCo&rsquos Racial Equality Journey Hispanic Initiative is an investment of $172 million over five years to address issues of inequality and create opportunity for Hispanics across our workforce, supply chain and communities. This investment is in addition to our 2020 spend of $224 million with Hispanic suppliers. Learn more about our Racial Equality Journey Hispanic Initiative.


15. Liv Garfield

Financial Times

Company: Severn Trent

Net worth: N/A

Approval rating: 91%

Liv Garfield worked her way up to the top of Severn Trent, a leading UK company responsible for supplying clean water to over 8 billion people. On her climb up the corporate ladder, Liv worked within different industry sectors (including her stint as BT’s Director of Strategy and Regulatory Affairs and later as chief executive for BT’s Openreach division).

During her term as Severn Trent’s CEO, she has proven herself to be a natural leader. Indeed, since her appointment in 2014, Severn Trent has had a remarkably positive upturn and was recently named 1 of the top 50 companies to work for in the UK company.


Fraser, the former head of consumer banking at Citigroup, was named CEO in February 2021. She is the first woman to head a major Wall Street Bank.

Frazer, who joined Citi in 2004, has held several senior roles at the bank including chief executive of Citigroup Latin America, chief executive of the U.S. consumer and commercial banking and CitiMortgage, and chief executive of Citi's global private bank. She is listed on Fortune's 2020 Most Powerful Women in Business and Forbes' 100 Most Powerful Women in the World 2020 lists.


4. Arianna Huffington

Company: Thrive Global

Net worth: $100 million (£75 million)

Arianna Huffington is the co-founder and former editor-in-chief of the successful news website HuffPost (previously the Huffington Post). After creating a digital news outlet, Huffington set her sights on launching a series of books, including the most recent, The Sleep Revolution. She also manages the wellness site Thrive Global and offers a six-week course to improve people’s overall wellbeing.


Indra Nooyi, Chanda Kochhar, Shikha Sharma Among Fortune's Most Powerful Business Women

This is the 17th year Fortune has ranked the most powerful women in business outside the US.

New York: Two Indians -- Chanda Kochhar and Shikha Sharma -- have made it to the rankings of most powerful women in business outside the United States drawn up by the Fortune magazine while Indra Nooyi featured in the top three on the US edition list. The Most Powerful Women in Business outside the US list, which was topped by Banco Santander group Executive Chairman Ana Botin, placed ICICI Bank's Kochhar at the 5th spot while Axis Bank's Sharma has been ranked 21st. PepsiCo Chairman and CEO Indra Nooyi came in at No. 2 on the US Most Powerful Women in Business list, led by General Motors Chairman and CEO Mary Barra. Lockheed Martin Chairman, President, and CEO Marillyn Hewson took the 3rd spot.

On Kochhar, Managing Director and CEO, ICICI Bank, Fortune said she has "led India's largest private lender for eight years, and under her stewardship ICICI Bank has thrived".

About Sharma, MD and CEO, Axis Bank, Fortune said, "Now that she has been reconfirmed as CEO, Sharma can focus on beefing up the bank's digital services, which includes expanding its digital payments app's reach".

The international list also includes GSK CEO Emma Walmsley at the second place, followed by Engie CEO Isabelle Kocher at the third slot.

This is the 17th year Fortune has ranked the most powerful women in business outside the US. The 50 global businesswomen represent 17 countries and many industries and had 11 newcomers this year.

The methodology involved four criteria: the size and importance of the woman's business in the global economy, the health and direction of the business, the arc of the woman's career (resume and runway ahead), and social and cultural influence.

The US list comprised 26 CEOs controlling $1.1 trillion in market cap, seven newcomers, one returnee, and nine women in the technology industry.

(Except for the headline, this story has not been edited by NDTV staff and is published from a syndicated feed.)


Nooyi, Kochhar, Shikha on Fortune’s most powerful women in business list

Chanda Kochhar and Shikha Sharma have been ranked among the most powerful businesswomen outside of the United States by Fortune magazine

New York: Two Indians — Chanda Kochhar and Shikha Sharma — have made it to the rankings of most powerful women in business outside the United States drawn up by the Fortune magazine while Indra Nooyi featured in the top three on the US edition list.

The Most Powerful Women in Business Outside the US list, which was topped by Banco Santander group executive chairman Ana Botin, placed ICICI Bank’s Kochhar at the fifth spot while Axis Bank’s Sharma has been ranked 21st.

PepsiCo chairman and CEO Indra Nooyi came in at No. 2 on the US Most Powerful Women in Business list, led by General Motors chairman and CEO Mary Barra. Lockheed Martin chairman, president and CEO Marillyn Hewson took the third spot.

On Kochhar, managing director and CEO, ICICI Bank, Fortune said she has “led India’s largest private lender for eight years, and under her stewardship ICICI Bank has thrived".

About Sharma, MD and CEO, Axis Bank, Fortune said, “now that she has been reconfirmed as CEO, Sharma can focus on beefing up the bank’s digital services, which includes expanding its digital payments app’s reach".

The international list also includes GSK CEO Emma Walmsley at the second place, followed by Engie CEO Isabelle Kocher at the third slot. This is the 17th year Fortune has ranked the most powerful women in business outside the US.

The 50 global businesswomen represent 17 countries and many industries and had 11 newcomers this year. The methodology involved four criteria: the size and importance of the woman’s business in the global economy, the health and direction of the business, the arc of the woman’s career (resume and runway ahead), and social and cultural influence.

The US list comprised 26 CEOs controlling $1.1 trillion in market cap, seven newcomers, one returnee, and nine women in the technology industry.


The 300 Most Powerful Black CEO, COO, and Other Executive Positions in America

They’re among the most transformative business leaders on the planet.

Ann-Marie Campbell, EVP, U.S. Stores for The Home Depot, runs a mammoth retail operation, contributing to $95 billion in 2016 annual revenues and management of roughly 400,000 employees. David Huntley, AT&T’s senior executive vice president and chief compliance officer handles, among other tasks, the safeguarding of customer and employee data as well as the reputation for the sprawling telecom giant that produced $164 billion in 2016 revenues and has a payroll of close to 270,000 worldwide. And as president of Holland America Cruise Lines, Orlando Ashford navigates a fleet of 15 premium vessels that carries roughly 850,000 guests annually to all seven continents, helping its profitable parent Carnival Corp., the world’s largest cruise operator, smoothly sail to $16.4 billion in 2016 revenues.

/> “The Humanity of Connection” video highlighted the careers of several AT&T executives, including Chief Compliance Officer David Huntley (Photo ©Tony Powell)

And those dynamos represent but a few of our corporate elite. It’s a fascinating collection of executive talent that impact an array of sectors, including those responsible for manufacturing autos and aircrafts, managing iconic, world-class brands, developing revolutionary software products, overseeing mammoth commercial transportation systems, investing billions in assets, and even one directs teams that design and create “experiential programming” for the some of the world’s largest shopping centers.

/> (Orlando Ashford. Image: File)

Meet the 300 Most Powerful Executives—men and women who ensure their corporations’ market leadership through revenue generation, profitability, market share, and strategic development. As such, they hold top-tier and executive officer positions within the entire enterprise operate core subsidiaries and divisions, and maintain billion-dollar budget authority. Positions include those with oversight of operations, sales, marketing, technological infrastructure, data science, product development and overall talent management and training.

Their roles could not be more vital in a business environment at warp speed as corporations must adapt to and apply tech that seemingly changes within nanoseconds, consume data to know every demographic and psychographic detail of clients and covet the millennial set as both customers and workers, pivoting in just about every area from brand marketing to the workplace’s mien.

It’s been five years since BLACK ENTERPRISE has developed the roster of Most Powerful Executives. And we have expanded our list from 100 senior managers—our number in 2009 and 2012—to 300 top executives. By far, it was our most expansive research of African American corporate leadership since we developed America’s 25 Hottest Managers in 1988—a roster that did not have a single black CEO or woman among them.

This year, our editorial research team reviewed more than 1,400 companies comprised of the 1,000 largest public corporations, 100 international companies with a major U.S. presence, all firms listed on the S&P 500, and 250 leading privately held companies. Due to the changing landscape, our list also consists of executives from previously excluded categories such as general counsel, chief technology officer, global human resources officer, or the equivalent.

While we developed this report, American Express CEO Kenneth Chenault—the model of global corporate leadership—announced his retirement, leaving the post that he’s held for 16 years on Feb. 1, 2018. Before we were greeted by this milestone, Ursula Burns stepped down as CEO of Xerox Corp. after the completion of its corporate restructuring earlier this year. Burns represented the first and only African American woman to be appointed chief executive of an S&P 500 company.

These departures reduce the ranks of black CEOs leading the largest publicly traded corporations to a handful. The ranks now include Kenneth Frazier of Merck & Co. Roger Ferguson of TIAA Arnold Donald of Carnival Corp. and Marvin Ellison of J.C. Penney.

Although Chenault’s departure diminishes the number of African Americans leading the 500 largest public companies, we found top leadership among a larger universe of public and private companies. So on our list, you’ll find not only the aforementioned chief executives but also leaders of publicly traded global leviathans like Craig Arnold of Dublin, Ireland-based Eaton Corp. plc (2016 annual revenues: $19.7 billion) and Tidjane Thiam of Zurich, Switzerland-based Credit Suisse (2016 annual revenues: $19.87 billion).

Among CEOs representing colossal private companies: Bernard Tyson of Kaiser Permanente (2016 operating revenues: $64.6 billion), Jo Ann Jenkins of AARP (2016 operating revenues: $1.6 billion), and Charles E. Phillips of Infor Global Solutions (2016 revenues: $2.8 billion). In fact, our list includes the first African American to lead a publicly traded commercial airline—albeit temporarily: Brett J. Hart, EVP, Chief Administrative Officer & General Counsel of United Continental Holdings, piloted the company for six months as acting CEO after president and CEO Oscar Munoz suffered a heart attack in October 2015.

/> ( Kaiser Permanente CEO Bernard Tyson. Image: File)

Discover the other groundbreakers who can be found on this exclusive listing.

Executives had to meet the following criteria to make our roster:

  • Each executive holds companywide and industrywide influence among the following universe: 1,000 largest publicly traded companies 100 largest international companies with significant U.S. operations the S&P 500 companies and largest privately held corporations. All companies have $1 billion or more in annual revenues.
  • Top-tier executives who serve as corporate officers or members of the senior leadership team.
  • Men and women in C-suite positions such as CEO (chief executive officer) COO (chief operating officer) CFO (chief financial officer) CAO (chief administrative officer) CIO/CTO (chief information officer/chief technology officer) or similar designation on their company’s leadership team, senior management group, executive committee, or corporate board.
  • Those who hold the position of Chief Compliance Officer, Chief Legal Officer and General Counsel as members of the senior leadership/corporate strategy team also made our list.
  • Other titles include president, general manager, executive vice president, or another top-ranking position with significant management responsibility and budget authority.
  • All executives have held their positions as of Nov. 1st.
  • Editors have also consulted leading executives, management experts, professional organizations, and other sources as part of the selection process.

Executives excluded from our list:

  • Non-executive corporate directors – regardless of board position (chairman, lead director).
  • Executives who manage local and statewide divisions.
  • Executives who work for government agencies and entities under full government control.
  • Regardless of inclusion on the executive committee, top executives with sole responsibility for staff functions including but not limited to corporate communications, corporate affairs, investor relations, public affairs, public policy, media relations, government relations, community affairs, philanthropy, and diversity. (BE has a separate listing for chief diversity officers.)
  • Although vital to global business overall, CEOs and top executives from the BE100s – the nation’s largest black businesses -were not included. (BE has separate rankings for the BE100s.
  • Leaders of corporate foundations.

List research was conducted by Lisa Fraser, Mia Hall, Roland Michel, Delicia Paisley-Smith and Tiamari Whitted.

View the entire The Most Powerful Executives in Corporate America list here.


Nooyi, Kochhar in Fortune's list of 50 powerful businesswomen

T he list includes IBM Chairman, CEO, President Ginni Rometty on the 2nd spot, energy corporation Petrobras CEO

Maria das Graças Silva Foster on the 4th spot, Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg (11), Yahoo President and CEO Marissa Mayer (14) and Google's Senior Vice President for Ads and Commerce Susan Wojcicki (20).