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Spritz Cookies

Spritz Cookies

These pretty little cookies are the perfect addition to any holiday dessert platter

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This recipe for festive shaped Spritz cookies has been adapted by my mother Donna Menyes from her 1984 edition of "Better Homes and Gardens New Cook Book," which I always lovingly called the "red and white checker cookbook." Over the years, she's learned that almond extract is not optional (as the original recipe calls states) and that a few tablespoons of milk help the cookies get through the cookie press easier. She also reduced the oven temperature and baking time, as these cookies are better slightly underbaked.

Notes

These cookies do require the use of a cookie press.

Ingredients

  • 3 1/2 Cups flour
  • 1 Teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 1/2 Cup butter
  • 1 Cup sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 1 Teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 Teaspoon almond extract
  • 2 Tablespoons milk

Servings20

Calories Per Serving245

Folate equivalent (total)7µg2%


Spritz Cookies

Spritz cookies are crumbly, simple, and iconic, especially when shared in Christmas cookie boxes. Originating in Germany and Scandinavia in the 16th century, these cookies are extruded from a piece of kitchen equipment that gives them their unique shape. For whatever reason, the cookie press (the kitchen tool required to make spritz cookies) spiked in popularity in America from the 60s to the 90s, leaving most of us nostalgically craving this type of sugar cookie come the holidays. The good news is that a cookie press is a really affordable piece of kitchen equipment, and that the cookie dough that goes into the press is one of the easiest doughs to make. The dough takes no more than 5 minutes to come together, and then it&rsquos just a matter of picking the patterns you want for your cookies and pushing the cookie dough into the cookie press. The only trick when making spritz cookies is to break one of the rules of cookie making&mdashuse an ungreased baking sheet and do not use parchment paper. The cookie dough has to stick to the baking sheet&rsquos surface when it&rsquos extruded from the cookie press, and if the cookie sheet is coated in oil, the cookie will not take its proper shape. Lastly, once the cookies have cooled, simply brush the cookies with a small amount of light corn syrup to help colorful holiday sprinkles to stick to the cookies.


Spritz Cookies

Spritz cookies are crumbly, simple, and iconic, especially when shared in Christmas cookie boxes. Originating in Germany and Scandinavia in the 16th century, these cookies are extruded from a piece of kitchen equipment that gives them their unique shape. For whatever reason, the cookie press (the kitchen tool required to make spritz cookies) spiked in popularity in America from the 60s to the 90s, leaving most of us nostalgically craving this type of sugar cookie come the holidays. The good news is that a cookie press is a really affordable piece of kitchen equipment, and that the cookie dough that goes into the press is one of the easiest doughs to make. The dough takes no more than 5 minutes to come together, and then it&rsquos just a matter of picking the patterns you want for your cookies and pushing the cookie dough into the cookie press. The only trick when making spritz cookies is to break one of the rules of cookie making&mdashuse an ungreased baking sheet and do not use parchment paper. The cookie dough has to stick to the baking sheet&rsquos surface when it&rsquos extruded from the cookie press, and if the cookie sheet is coated in oil, the cookie will not take its proper shape. Lastly, once the cookies have cooled, simply brush the cookies with a small amount of light corn syrup to help colorful holiday sprinkles to stick to the cookies.


Spritz Cookies

Spritz cookies are crumbly, simple, and iconic, especially when shared in Christmas cookie boxes. Originating in Germany and Scandinavia in the 16th century, these cookies are extruded from a piece of kitchen equipment that gives them their unique shape. For whatever reason, the cookie press (the kitchen tool required to make spritz cookies) spiked in popularity in America from the 60s to the 90s, leaving most of us nostalgically craving this type of sugar cookie come the holidays. The good news is that a cookie press is a really affordable piece of kitchen equipment, and that the cookie dough that goes into the press is one of the easiest doughs to make. The dough takes no more than 5 minutes to come together, and then it&rsquos just a matter of picking the patterns you want for your cookies and pushing the cookie dough into the cookie press. The only trick when making spritz cookies is to break one of the rules of cookie making&mdashuse an ungreased baking sheet and do not use parchment paper. The cookie dough has to stick to the baking sheet&rsquos surface when it&rsquos extruded from the cookie press, and if the cookie sheet is coated in oil, the cookie will not take its proper shape. Lastly, once the cookies have cooled, simply brush the cookies with a small amount of light corn syrup to help colorful holiday sprinkles to stick to the cookies.


Spritz Cookies

Spritz cookies are crumbly, simple, and iconic, especially when shared in Christmas cookie boxes. Originating in Germany and Scandinavia in the 16th century, these cookies are extruded from a piece of kitchen equipment that gives them their unique shape. For whatever reason, the cookie press (the kitchen tool required to make spritz cookies) spiked in popularity in America from the 60s to the 90s, leaving most of us nostalgically craving this type of sugar cookie come the holidays. The good news is that a cookie press is a really affordable piece of kitchen equipment, and that the cookie dough that goes into the press is one of the easiest doughs to make. The dough takes no more than 5 minutes to come together, and then it&rsquos just a matter of picking the patterns you want for your cookies and pushing the cookie dough into the cookie press. The only trick when making spritz cookies is to break one of the rules of cookie making&mdashuse an ungreased baking sheet and do not use parchment paper. The cookie dough has to stick to the baking sheet&rsquos surface when it&rsquos extruded from the cookie press, and if the cookie sheet is coated in oil, the cookie will not take its proper shape. Lastly, once the cookies have cooled, simply brush the cookies with a small amount of light corn syrup to help colorful holiday sprinkles to stick to the cookies.


Spritz Cookies

Spritz cookies are crumbly, simple, and iconic, especially when shared in Christmas cookie boxes. Originating in Germany and Scandinavia in the 16th century, these cookies are extruded from a piece of kitchen equipment that gives them their unique shape. For whatever reason, the cookie press (the kitchen tool required to make spritz cookies) spiked in popularity in America from the 60s to the 90s, leaving most of us nostalgically craving this type of sugar cookie come the holidays. The good news is that a cookie press is a really affordable piece of kitchen equipment, and that the cookie dough that goes into the press is one of the easiest doughs to make. The dough takes no more than 5 minutes to come together, and then it&rsquos just a matter of picking the patterns you want for your cookies and pushing the cookie dough into the cookie press. The only trick when making spritz cookies is to break one of the rules of cookie making&mdashuse an ungreased baking sheet and do not use parchment paper. The cookie dough has to stick to the baking sheet&rsquos surface when it&rsquos extruded from the cookie press, and if the cookie sheet is coated in oil, the cookie will not take its proper shape. Lastly, once the cookies have cooled, simply brush the cookies with a small amount of light corn syrup to help colorful holiday sprinkles to stick to the cookies.


Spritz Cookies

Spritz cookies are crumbly, simple, and iconic, especially when shared in Christmas cookie boxes. Originating in Germany and Scandinavia in the 16th century, these cookies are extruded from a piece of kitchen equipment that gives them their unique shape. For whatever reason, the cookie press (the kitchen tool required to make spritz cookies) spiked in popularity in America from the 60s to the 90s, leaving most of us nostalgically craving this type of sugar cookie come the holidays. The good news is that a cookie press is a really affordable piece of kitchen equipment, and that the cookie dough that goes into the press is one of the easiest doughs to make. The dough takes no more than 5 minutes to come together, and then it&rsquos just a matter of picking the patterns you want for your cookies and pushing the cookie dough into the cookie press. The only trick when making spritz cookies is to break one of the rules of cookie making&mdashuse an ungreased baking sheet and do not use parchment paper. The cookie dough has to stick to the baking sheet&rsquos surface when it&rsquos extruded from the cookie press, and if the cookie sheet is coated in oil, the cookie will not take its proper shape. Lastly, once the cookies have cooled, simply brush the cookies with a small amount of light corn syrup to help colorful holiday sprinkles to stick to the cookies.


Spritz Cookies

Spritz cookies are crumbly, simple, and iconic, especially when shared in Christmas cookie boxes. Originating in Germany and Scandinavia in the 16th century, these cookies are extruded from a piece of kitchen equipment that gives them their unique shape. For whatever reason, the cookie press (the kitchen tool required to make spritz cookies) spiked in popularity in America from the 60s to the 90s, leaving most of us nostalgically craving this type of sugar cookie come the holidays. The good news is that a cookie press is a really affordable piece of kitchen equipment, and that the cookie dough that goes into the press is one of the easiest doughs to make. The dough takes no more than 5 minutes to come together, and then it&rsquos just a matter of picking the patterns you want for your cookies and pushing the cookie dough into the cookie press. The only trick when making spritz cookies is to break one of the rules of cookie making&mdashuse an ungreased baking sheet and do not use parchment paper. The cookie dough has to stick to the baking sheet&rsquos surface when it&rsquos extruded from the cookie press, and if the cookie sheet is coated in oil, the cookie will not take its proper shape. Lastly, once the cookies have cooled, simply brush the cookies with a small amount of light corn syrup to help colorful holiday sprinkles to stick to the cookies.


Spritz Cookies

Spritz cookies are crumbly, simple, and iconic, especially when shared in Christmas cookie boxes. Originating in Germany and Scandinavia in the 16th century, these cookies are extruded from a piece of kitchen equipment that gives them their unique shape. For whatever reason, the cookie press (the kitchen tool required to make spritz cookies) spiked in popularity in America from the 60s to the 90s, leaving most of us nostalgically craving this type of sugar cookie come the holidays. The good news is that a cookie press is a really affordable piece of kitchen equipment, and that the cookie dough that goes into the press is one of the easiest doughs to make. The dough takes no more than 5 minutes to come together, and then it&rsquos just a matter of picking the patterns you want for your cookies and pushing the cookie dough into the cookie press. The only trick when making spritz cookies is to break one of the rules of cookie making&mdashuse an ungreased baking sheet and do not use parchment paper. The cookie dough has to stick to the baking sheet&rsquos surface when it&rsquos extruded from the cookie press, and if the cookie sheet is coated in oil, the cookie will not take its proper shape. Lastly, once the cookies have cooled, simply brush the cookies with a small amount of light corn syrup to help colorful holiday sprinkles to stick to the cookies.


Spritz Cookies

Spritz cookies are crumbly, simple, and iconic, especially when shared in Christmas cookie boxes. Originating in Germany and Scandinavia in the 16th century, these cookies are extruded from a piece of kitchen equipment that gives them their unique shape. For whatever reason, the cookie press (the kitchen tool required to make spritz cookies) spiked in popularity in America from the 60s to the 90s, leaving most of us nostalgically craving this type of sugar cookie come the holidays. The good news is that a cookie press is a really affordable piece of kitchen equipment, and that the cookie dough that goes into the press is one of the easiest doughs to make. The dough takes no more than 5 minutes to come together, and then it&rsquos just a matter of picking the patterns you want for your cookies and pushing the cookie dough into the cookie press. The only trick when making spritz cookies is to break one of the rules of cookie making&mdashuse an ungreased baking sheet and do not use parchment paper. The cookie dough has to stick to the baking sheet&rsquos surface when it&rsquos extruded from the cookie press, and if the cookie sheet is coated in oil, the cookie will not take its proper shape. Lastly, once the cookies have cooled, simply brush the cookies with a small amount of light corn syrup to help colorful holiday sprinkles to stick to the cookies.


Spritz Cookies

Spritz cookies are crumbly, simple, and iconic, especially when shared in Christmas cookie boxes. Originating in Germany and Scandinavia in the 16th century, these cookies are extruded from a piece of kitchen equipment that gives them their unique shape. For whatever reason, the cookie press (the kitchen tool required to make spritz cookies) spiked in popularity in America from the 60s to the 90s, leaving most of us nostalgically craving this type of sugar cookie come the holidays. The good news is that a cookie press is a really affordable piece of kitchen equipment, and that the cookie dough that goes into the press is one of the easiest doughs to make. The dough takes no more than 5 minutes to come together, and then it&rsquos just a matter of picking the patterns you want for your cookies and pushing the cookie dough into the cookie press. The only trick when making spritz cookies is to break one of the rules of cookie making&mdashuse an ungreased baking sheet and do not use parchment paper. The cookie dough has to stick to the baking sheet&rsquos surface when it&rsquos extruded from the cookie press, and if the cookie sheet is coated in oil, the cookie will not take its proper shape. Lastly, once the cookies have cooled, simply brush the cookies with a small amount of light corn syrup to help colorful holiday sprinkles to stick to the cookies.