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Oasis in an Urban Desert: The Village Marketplace

Oasis in an Urban Desert: The Village Marketplace

After arriving at the local grocery store, you may be intimidated into changing your tune. Navigating the aisles of produce can be daunting for those who are clueless in the kitchen, and paying for fresh fruits and vegetables can leave quite a dent in your wallet. But don’t let a hectic afternoon in the grocery store stop you from eating healthier. A perfect alternative to the linoleum flooring and bright fluorescent lights of a supermarket lies just a block away from campus in the form of an urban garden.

Photo by VMP on Yelp.

Located on Bill Robertson Lane, the Village Marketplace is a project funded by Community Services Unlimited (CSU) a non-profit organization geared towards helping communities in Los Angeles address problems of inequality and unsustainability.

The kind people of the Village Marketplace serve local restaurants and caterers with fresh, seasonal and organic produce at competitive prices.

By only buying produce from small local farms or harvesting from CSU’s own mini-farms, the Village Marketplace helps increase access to healthy food in the LA community while supporting marginalized farmers.

This is all good and dandy for the businesses, but at the end of the day, your fridge is still empty. How can locals directly get a hold of all this fresh food?

Gotta Bag It Up

Photo by Nga Do

With CSU’s latest endeavor, LA residents can subscribe to the Farm Fresh Produce Bag Program and receive a bag brimming with locally sourced fruits, vegetables, and herbs.

Bags are picked up weekly and come in two sizes: small (serves 1-2 people) and large (serves 3-4 people). At as low as $10 a week for a full grocery bag of fresh organic produce, CSU’s prices definitely beat the local grocery chains.

Though there are pick up spots as close as right by the Coliseum and even on campus at the United University Church, the Village Marketplace also offers a produce bag delivery option. Check out this map to see if your home is an eligible delivery location.

Panic! In the Kitchen

So you subscribed and had your groceries delivered straight to your door. Warm feelings are passed all around—you’ve shown your support for the Los Angeles community and you have a bag full of fresh produce to show for it.

Wait, an eggplant? Sweet potatoes? Kale? As you pull out your new loot, you realize that your cooking expertise really does stop at ramen noodles. Before you have a minor mental breakdown on your kitchen floor (or at the very least bemoan your loss of ten dollars), check your email.

Every week, CSU sends all its subscribers recipes and how-to’s so that all the items in the produce bags can be fully utilized in delicious and healthy meals. Subscribers also receive newsletters with articles on the nutritional value and health benefits of featured produce bag items.

Being healthy never felt so good.

The post Oasis in an Urban Desert: The Village Marketplace appeared first on Spoon University.


Gâteau Basque: The Signature Basque Dessert

This relatively simple custard filled cake has a dedicated following within Basque communities. There is a Gâteau Basque Museum committed to demonstrating the technique of baking and a two-day Fête du Gâteau Basque in the adorable Basque village of Kanbo (Lapardi) in the southern part of France.

Traditionally filled with black cherry jam or a rum-flavored cream surrounded by a crunchy tart-like exterior, this gâteau sounds more similar to a pie than a cake. There is an easy trick to know which filling to expect: if there is a crosshatch pattern on the top, then the filling is cream, and if there is a Basque rounded cross (lauburu) then the filling is black cherry.

According to Mark Kurlansky, author of The Basque History of the World, gâteau Basque appears to date from the eighteenth century, may have originally been made with bread, and called bistochak.

Of the two fillings, cherry is the oldest, suggesting that the first gâteau Basque was a form of cherry bread.

To make a traditional gâteau Basque with the real black cherry jam, one must use xapata cherries which are only found in the valley of the Nivelle River during a couple of weeks in June. The cherries that survive the initial harvest are saved in the form of preserves then used for cake filling. This cake is considered a regional specialty, and gâteau experts state that you must only use jam from this region when making it.

Within one family of the Basque diaspora community, this particular recipe has been handed down for generations, evoking memories of homeland through the simple act of eating a family meal. This recipe comes from Valerie Arrechea, president of the North American Basque Organizations, passed down from her husband’s great-aunt Jeanette Iribarren who brought it from Banka, in the Basque region of France.

Valerie will demonstrate how to make gâteau Basque at the 2016 Folklife Festival in the Ostatua Kitchen. Valerie Arrechea was kind enough to share her family recipe with those of us who have not had the opportunity to taste this fantastic Basque cake.

Cream Ingredients

Cake Ingredients

  • 2 whole eggs
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1 1/2 cup sugar
  • 3 1/3 cup flour
  • 1 cup unsalted butter (softened)
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • Flavoring of choice (2 tbs Pernod, 2 tbs rum)

Directions for the Cream

  1. In a medium bowl, combine the 2 egg yolks and 1/4 cup sugar. Beat until frothy. Add 3 tbs flour.
  2. In a saucepan, boil 1 1/4 cup milk and vanilla (to taste).
  3. Add a small amount of the milk and vanilla to the bowl of egg and sugar. This is so that the eggs do not cook too fast and curdle. Then add the mixture from the bowl to the saucepan.
  4. Bring back to a boil for a few minutes and whisk until it thickens.
  5. Take off the stove and put in a larger bowl to cool. Cover top with plastic wrap so that it doesn’t make a film.

Directions for the Cake

  1. In a medium bowl, mix together the sugar, two whole eggs, and one egg yolk.
  2. Add the softened butter, flour, and baking powder.
  3. Add flavoring of choice: Ricard, Pernod, rum, etc.
  4. If you have time, let it sit overnight in the refrigerator. This will allow you to roll out the dough. Roll out the bottom in a springform pan, pour in the cream, then roll out the top to cover.

  1. If you plan to cook it the same day, take small balls of the dough, cover with a little flour so it doesn’t stick, and pat into place in the pie pan. Cover bottom and sides of pan—it will come together when it cooks. Pour in cream. Pat out top layer.
  2. Wash top with egg yolk and add design if desired. This helps the dough come together and look uniform.
  3. Bake in 350 degree oven for 40 to 45 minutes.

Helpful Hints

  1. This dough has a lot of butter so it melts very quickly, especially when it is hot and humid. Work fast rolling the dough out when you take it out of the refrigerator, otherwise it will melt apart.
  2. When you add the custard to the middle of the cake, leave an inch of free space around the bottom of the cake so that the top crust can fuse with the bottom crust.
  3. When you are attaching the top and the bottom, you can use a little water as glue.

SarahVictoria Rosemann is the Folklife Festival media intern. She has a degree in ethnomusicology, with a focus in Tibetology, and grew up in Reno, Nevada.


Gâteau Basque: The Signature Basque Dessert

This relatively simple custard filled cake has a dedicated following within Basque communities. There is a Gâteau Basque Museum committed to demonstrating the technique of baking and a two-day Fête du Gâteau Basque in the adorable Basque village of Kanbo (Lapardi) in the southern part of France.

Traditionally filled with black cherry jam or a rum-flavored cream surrounded by a crunchy tart-like exterior, this gâteau sounds more similar to a pie than a cake. There is an easy trick to know which filling to expect: if there is a crosshatch pattern on the top, then the filling is cream, and if there is a Basque rounded cross (lauburu) then the filling is black cherry.

According to Mark Kurlansky, author of The Basque History of the World, gâteau Basque appears to date from the eighteenth century, may have originally been made with bread, and called bistochak.

Of the two fillings, cherry is the oldest, suggesting that the first gâteau Basque was a form of cherry bread.

To make a traditional gâteau Basque with the real black cherry jam, one must use xapata cherries which are only found in the valley of the Nivelle River during a couple of weeks in June. The cherries that survive the initial harvest are saved in the form of preserves then used for cake filling. This cake is considered a regional specialty, and gâteau experts state that you must only use jam from this region when making it.

Within one family of the Basque diaspora community, this particular recipe has been handed down for generations, evoking memories of homeland through the simple act of eating a family meal. This recipe comes from Valerie Arrechea, president of the North American Basque Organizations, passed down from her husband’s great-aunt Jeanette Iribarren who brought it from Banka, in the Basque region of France.

Valerie will demonstrate how to make gâteau Basque at the 2016 Folklife Festival in the Ostatua Kitchen. Valerie Arrechea was kind enough to share her family recipe with those of us who have not had the opportunity to taste this fantastic Basque cake.

Cream Ingredients

Cake Ingredients

  • 2 whole eggs
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1 1/2 cup sugar
  • 3 1/3 cup flour
  • 1 cup unsalted butter (softened)
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • Flavoring of choice (2 tbs Pernod, 2 tbs rum)

Directions for the Cream

  1. In a medium bowl, combine the 2 egg yolks and 1/4 cup sugar. Beat until frothy. Add 3 tbs flour.
  2. In a saucepan, boil 1 1/4 cup milk and vanilla (to taste).
  3. Add a small amount of the milk and vanilla to the bowl of egg and sugar. This is so that the eggs do not cook too fast and curdle. Then add the mixture from the bowl to the saucepan.
  4. Bring back to a boil for a few minutes and whisk until it thickens.
  5. Take off the stove and put in a larger bowl to cool. Cover top with plastic wrap so that it doesn’t make a film.

Directions for the Cake

  1. In a medium bowl, mix together the sugar, two whole eggs, and one egg yolk.
  2. Add the softened butter, flour, and baking powder.
  3. Add flavoring of choice: Ricard, Pernod, rum, etc.
  4. If you have time, let it sit overnight in the refrigerator. This will allow you to roll out the dough. Roll out the bottom in a springform pan, pour in the cream, then roll out the top to cover.

  1. If you plan to cook it the same day, take small balls of the dough, cover with a little flour so it doesn’t stick, and pat into place in the pie pan. Cover bottom and sides of pan—it will come together when it cooks. Pour in cream. Pat out top layer.
  2. Wash top with egg yolk and add design if desired. This helps the dough come together and look uniform.
  3. Bake in 350 degree oven for 40 to 45 minutes.

Helpful Hints

  1. This dough has a lot of butter so it melts very quickly, especially when it is hot and humid. Work fast rolling the dough out when you take it out of the refrigerator, otherwise it will melt apart.
  2. When you add the custard to the middle of the cake, leave an inch of free space around the bottom of the cake so that the top crust can fuse with the bottom crust.
  3. When you are attaching the top and the bottom, you can use a little water as glue.

SarahVictoria Rosemann is the Folklife Festival media intern. She has a degree in ethnomusicology, with a focus in Tibetology, and grew up in Reno, Nevada.


Gâteau Basque: The Signature Basque Dessert

This relatively simple custard filled cake has a dedicated following within Basque communities. There is a Gâteau Basque Museum committed to demonstrating the technique of baking and a two-day Fête du Gâteau Basque in the adorable Basque village of Kanbo (Lapardi) in the southern part of France.

Traditionally filled with black cherry jam or a rum-flavored cream surrounded by a crunchy tart-like exterior, this gâteau sounds more similar to a pie than a cake. There is an easy trick to know which filling to expect: if there is a crosshatch pattern on the top, then the filling is cream, and if there is a Basque rounded cross (lauburu) then the filling is black cherry.

According to Mark Kurlansky, author of The Basque History of the World, gâteau Basque appears to date from the eighteenth century, may have originally been made with bread, and called bistochak.

Of the two fillings, cherry is the oldest, suggesting that the first gâteau Basque was a form of cherry bread.

To make a traditional gâteau Basque with the real black cherry jam, one must use xapata cherries which are only found in the valley of the Nivelle River during a couple of weeks in June. The cherries that survive the initial harvest are saved in the form of preserves then used for cake filling. This cake is considered a regional specialty, and gâteau experts state that you must only use jam from this region when making it.

Within one family of the Basque diaspora community, this particular recipe has been handed down for generations, evoking memories of homeland through the simple act of eating a family meal. This recipe comes from Valerie Arrechea, president of the North American Basque Organizations, passed down from her husband’s great-aunt Jeanette Iribarren who brought it from Banka, in the Basque region of France.

Valerie will demonstrate how to make gâteau Basque at the 2016 Folklife Festival in the Ostatua Kitchen. Valerie Arrechea was kind enough to share her family recipe with those of us who have not had the opportunity to taste this fantastic Basque cake.

Cream Ingredients

Cake Ingredients

  • 2 whole eggs
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1 1/2 cup sugar
  • 3 1/3 cup flour
  • 1 cup unsalted butter (softened)
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • Flavoring of choice (2 tbs Pernod, 2 tbs rum)

Directions for the Cream

  1. In a medium bowl, combine the 2 egg yolks and 1/4 cup sugar. Beat until frothy. Add 3 tbs flour.
  2. In a saucepan, boil 1 1/4 cup milk and vanilla (to taste).
  3. Add a small amount of the milk and vanilla to the bowl of egg and sugar. This is so that the eggs do not cook too fast and curdle. Then add the mixture from the bowl to the saucepan.
  4. Bring back to a boil for a few minutes and whisk until it thickens.
  5. Take off the stove and put in a larger bowl to cool. Cover top with plastic wrap so that it doesn’t make a film.

Directions for the Cake

  1. In a medium bowl, mix together the sugar, two whole eggs, and one egg yolk.
  2. Add the softened butter, flour, and baking powder.
  3. Add flavoring of choice: Ricard, Pernod, rum, etc.
  4. If you have time, let it sit overnight in the refrigerator. This will allow you to roll out the dough. Roll out the bottom in a springform pan, pour in the cream, then roll out the top to cover.

  1. If you plan to cook it the same day, take small balls of the dough, cover with a little flour so it doesn’t stick, and pat into place in the pie pan. Cover bottom and sides of pan—it will come together when it cooks. Pour in cream. Pat out top layer.
  2. Wash top with egg yolk and add design if desired. This helps the dough come together and look uniform.
  3. Bake in 350 degree oven for 40 to 45 minutes.

Helpful Hints

  1. This dough has a lot of butter so it melts very quickly, especially when it is hot and humid. Work fast rolling the dough out when you take it out of the refrigerator, otherwise it will melt apart.
  2. When you add the custard to the middle of the cake, leave an inch of free space around the bottom of the cake so that the top crust can fuse with the bottom crust.
  3. When you are attaching the top and the bottom, you can use a little water as glue.

SarahVictoria Rosemann is the Folklife Festival media intern. She has a degree in ethnomusicology, with a focus in Tibetology, and grew up in Reno, Nevada.


Gâteau Basque: The Signature Basque Dessert

This relatively simple custard filled cake has a dedicated following within Basque communities. There is a Gâteau Basque Museum committed to demonstrating the technique of baking and a two-day Fête du Gâteau Basque in the adorable Basque village of Kanbo (Lapardi) in the southern part of France.

Traditionally filled with black cherry jam or a rum-flavored cream surrounded by a crunchy tart-like exterior, this gâteau sounds more similar to a pie than a cake. There is an easy trick to know which filling to expect: if there is a crosshatch pattern on the top, then the filling is cream, and if there is a Basque rounded cross (lauburu) then the filling is black cherry.

According to Mark Kurlansky, author of The Basque History of the World, gâteau Basque appears to date from the eighteenth century, may have originally been made with bread, and called bistochak.

Of the two fillings, cherry is the oldest, suggesting that the first gâteau Basque was a form of cherry bread.

To make a traditional gâteau Basque with the real black cherry jam, one must use xapata cherries which are only found in the valley of the Nivelle River during a couple of weeks in June. The cherries that survive the initial harvest are saved in the form of preserves then used for cake filling. This cake is considered a regional specialty, and gâteau experts state that you must only use jam from this region when making it.

Within one family of the Basque diaspora community, this particular recipe has been handed down for generations, evoking memories of homeland through the simple act of eating a family meal. This recipe comes from Valerie Arrechea, president of the North American Basque Organizations, passed down from her husband’s great-aunt Jeanette Iribarren who brought it from Banka, in the Basque region of France.

Valerie will demonstrate how to make gâteau Basque at the 2016 Folklife Festival in the Ostatua Kitchen. Valerie Arrechea was kind enough to share her family recipe with those of us who have not had the opportunity to taste this fantastic Basque cake.

Cream Ingredients

Cake Ingredients

  • 2 whole eggs
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1 1/2 cup sugar
  • 3 1/3 cup flour
  • 1 cup unsalted butter (softened)
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • Flavoring of choice (2 tbs Pernod, 2 tbs rum)

Directions for the Cream

  1. In a medium bowl, combine the 2 egg yolks and 1/4 cup sugar. Beat until frothy. Add 3 tbs flour.
  2. In a saucepan, boil 1 1/4 cup milk and vanilla (to taste).
  3. Add a small amount of the milk and vanilla to the bowl of egg and sugar. This is so that the eggs do not cook too fast and curdle. Then add the mixture from the bowl to the saucepan.
  4. Bring back to a boil for a few minutes and whisk until it thickens.
  5. Take off the stove and put in a larger bowl to cool. Cover top with plastic wrap so that it doesn’t make a film.

Directions for the Cake

  1. In a medium bowl, mix together the sugar, two whole eggs, and one egg yolk.
  2. Add the softened butter, flour, and baking powder.
  3. Add flavoring of choice: Ricard, Pernod, rum, etc.
  4. If you have time, let it sit overnight in the refrigerator. This will allow you to roll out the dough. Roll out the bottom in a springform pan, pour in the cream, then roll out the top to cover.

  1. If you plan to cook it the same day, take small balls of the dough, cover with a little flour so it doesn’t stick, and pat into place in the pie pan. Cover bottom and sides of pan—it will come together when it cooks. Pour in cream. Pat out top layer.
  2. Wash top with egg yolk and add design if desired. This helps the dough come together and look uniform.
  3. Bake in 350 degree oven for 40 to 45 minutes.

Helpful Hints

  1. This dough has a lot of butter so it melts very quickly, especially when it is hot and humid. Work fast rolling the dough out when you take it out of the refrigerator, otherwise it will melt apart.
  2. When you add the custard to the middle of the cake, leave an inch of free space around the bottom of the cake so that the top crust can fuse with the bottom crust.
  3. When you are attaching the top and the bottom, you can use a little water as glue.

SarahVictoria Rosemann is the Folklife Festival media intern. She has a degree in ethnomusicology, with a focus in Tibetology, and grew up in Reno, Nevada.


Gâteau Basque: The Signature Basque Dessert

This relatively simple custard filled cake has a dedicated following within Basque communities. There is a Gâteau Basque Museum committed to demonstrating the technique of baking and a two-day Fête du Gâteau Basque in the adorable Basque village of Kanbo (Lapardi) in the southern part of France.

Traditionally filled with black cherry jam or a rum-flavored cream surrounded by a crunchy tart-like exterior, this gâteau sounds more similar to a pie than a cake. There is an easy trick to know which filling to expect: if there is a crosshatch pattern on the top, then the filling is cream, and if there is a Basque rounded cross (lauburu) then the filling is black cherry.

According to Mark Kurlansky, author of The Basque History of the World, gâteau Basque appears to date from the eighteenth century, may have originally been made with bread, and called bistochak.

Of the two fillings, cherry is the oldest, suggesting that the first gâteau Basque was a form of cherry bread.

To make a traditional gâteau Basque with the real black cherry jam, one must use xapata cherries which are only found in the valley of the Nivelle River during a couple of weeks in June. The cherries that survive the initial harvest are saved in the form of preserves then used for cake filling. This cake is considered a regional specialty, and gâteau experts state that you must only use jam from this region when making it.

Within one family of the Basque diaspora community, this particular recipe has been handed down for generations, evoking memories of homeland through the simple act of eating a family meal. This recipe comes from Valerie Arrechea, president of the North American Basque Organizations, passed down from her husband’s great-aunt Jeanette Iribarren who brought it from Banka, in the Basque region of France.

Valerie will demonstrate how to make gâteau Basque at the 2016 Folklife Festival in the Ostatua Kitchen. Valerie Arrechea was kind enough to share her family recipe with those of us who have not had the opportunity to taste this fantastic Basque cake.

Cream Ingredients

Cake Ingredients

  • 2 whole eggs
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1 1/2 cup sugar
  • 3 1/3 cup flour
  • 1 cup unsalted butter (softened)
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • Flavoring of choice (2 tbs Pernod, 2 tbs rum)

Directions for the Cream

  1. In a medium bowl, combine the 2 egg yolks and 1/4 cup sugar. Beat until frothy. Add 3 tbs flour.
  2. In a saucepan, boil 1 1/4 cup milk and vanilla (to taste).
  3. Add a small amount of the milk and vanilla to the bowl of egg and sugar. This is so that the eggs do not cook too fast and curdle. Then add the mixture from the bowl to the saucepan.
  4. Bring back to a boil for a few minutes and whisk until it thickens.
  5. Take off the stove and put in a larger bowl to cool. Cover top with plastic wrap so that it doesn’t make a film.

Directions for the Cake

  1. In a medium bowl, mix together the sugar, two whole eggs, and one egg yolk.
  2. Add the softened butter, flour, and baking powder.
  3. Add flavoring of choice: Ricard, Pernod, rum, etc.
  4. If you have time, let it sit overnight in the refrigerator. This will allow you to roll out the dough. Roll out the bottom in a springform pan, pour in the cream, then roll out the top to cover.

  1. If you plan to cook it the same day, take small balls of the dough, cover with a little flour so it doesn’t stick, and pat into place in the pie pan. Cover bottom and sides of pan—it will come together when it cooks. Pour in cream. Pat out top layer.
  2. Wash top with egg yolk and add design if desired. This helps the dough come together and look uniform.
  3. Bake in 350 degree oven for 40 to 45 minutes.

Helpful Hints

  1. This dough has a lot of butter so it melts very quickly, especially when it is hot and humid. Work fast rolling the dough out when you take it out of the refrigerator, otherwise it will melt apart.
  2. When you add the custard to the middle of the cake, leave an inch of free space around the bottom of the cake so that the top crust can fuse with the bottom crust.
  3. When you are attaching the top and the bottom, you can use a little water as glue.

SarahVictoria Rosemann is the Folklife Festival media intern. She has a degree in ethnomusicology, with a focus in Tibetology, and grew up in Reno, Nevada.


Gâteau Basque: The Signature Basque Dessert

This relatively simple custard filled cake has a dedicated following within Basque communities. There is a Gâteau Basque Museum committed to demonstrating the technique of baking and a two-day Fête du Gâteau Basque in the adorable Basque village of Kanbo (Lapardi) in the southern part of France.

Traditionally filled with black cherry jam or a rum-flavored cream surrounded by a crunchy tart-like exterior, this gâteau sounds more similar to a pie than a cake. There is an easy trick to know which filling to expect: if there is a crosshatch pattern on the top, then the filling is cream, and if there is a Basque rounded cross (lauburu) then the filling is black cherry.

According to Mark Kurlansky, author of The Basque History of the World, gâteau Basque appears to date from the eighteenth century, may have originally been made with bread, and called bistochak.

Of the two fillings, cherry is the oldest, suggesting that the first gâteau Basque was a form of cherry bread.

To make a traditional gâteau Basque with the real black cherry jam, one must use xapata cherries which are only found in the valley of the Nivelle River during a couple of weeks in June. The cherries that survive the initial harvest are saved in the form of preserves then used for cake filling. This cake is considered a regional specialty, and gâteau experts state that you must only use jam from this region when making it.

Within one family of the Basque diaspora community, this particular recipe has been handed down for generations, evoking memories of homeland through the simple act of eating a family meal. This recipe comes from Valerie Arrechea, president of the North American Basque Organizations, passed down from her husband’s great-aunt Jeanette Iribarren who brought it from Banka, in the Basque region of France.

Valerie will demonstrate how to make gâteau Basque at the 2016 Folklife Festival in the Ostatua Kitchen. Valerie Arrechea was kind enough to share her family recipe with those of us who have not had the opportunity to taste this fantastic Basque cake.

Cream Ingredients

Cake Ingredients

  • 2 whole eggs
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1 1/2 cup sugar
  • 3 1/3 cup flour
  • 1 cup unsalted butter (softened)
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • Flavoring of choice (2 tbs Pernod, 2 tbs rum)

Directions for the Cream

  1. In a medium bowl, combine the 2 egg yolks and 1/4 cup sugar. Beat until frothy. Add 3 tbs flour.
  2. In a saucepan, boil 1 1/4 cup milk and vanilla (to taste).
  3. Add a small amount of the milk and vanilla to the bowl of egg and sugar. This is so that the eggs do not cook too fast and curdle. Then add the mixture from the bowl to the saucepan.
  4. Bring back to a boil for a few minutes and whisk until it thickens.
  5. Take off the stove and put in a larger bowl to cool. Cover top with plastic wrap so that it doesn’t make a film.

Directions for the Cake

  1. In a medium bowl, mix together the sugar, two whole eggs, and one egg yolk.
  2. Add the softened butter, flour, and baking powder.
  3. Add flavoring of choice: Ricard, Pernod, rum, etc.
  4. If you have time, let it sit overnight in the refrigerator. This will allow you to roll out the dough. Roll out the bottom in a springform pan, pour in the cream, then roll out the top to cover.

  1. If you plan to cook it the same day, take small balls of the dough, cover with a little flour so it doesn’t stick, and pat into place in the pie pan. Cover bottom and sides of pan—it will come together when it cooks. Pour in cream. Pat out top layer.
  2. Wash top with egg yolk and add design if desired. This helps the dough come together and look uniform.
  3. Bake in 350 degree oven for 40 to 45 minutes.

Helpful Hints

  1. This dough has a lot of butter so it melts very quickly, especially when it is hot and humid. Work fast rolling the dough out when you take it out of the refrigerator, otherwise it will melt apart.
  2. When you add the custard to the middle of the cake, leave an inch of free space around the bottom of the cake so that the top crust can fuse with the bottom crust.
  3. When you are attaching the top and the bottom, you can use a little water as glue.

SarahVictoria Rosemann is the Folklife Festival media intern. She has a degree in ethnomusicology, with a focus in Tibetology, and grew up in Reno, Nevada.


Gâteau Basque: The Signature Basque Dessert

This relatively simple custard filled cake has a dedicated following within Basque communities. There is a Gâteau Basque Museum committed to demonstrating the technique of baking and a two-day Fête du Gâteau Basque in the adorable Basque village of Kanbo (Lapardi) in the southern part of France.

Traditionally filled with black cherry jam or a rum-flavored cream surrounded by a crunchy tart-like exterior, this gâteau sounds more similar to a pie than a cake. There is an easy trick to know which filling to expect: if there is a crosshatch pattern on the top, then the filling is cream, and if there is a Basque rounded cross (lauburu) then the filling is black cherry.

According to Mark Kurlansky, author of The Basque History of the World, gâteau Basque appears to date from the eighteenth century, may have originally been made with bread, and called bistochak.

Of the two fillings, cherry is the oldest, suggesting that the first gâteau Basque was a form of cherry bread.

To make a traditional gâteau Basque with the real black cherry jam, one must use xapata cherries which are only found in the valley of the Nivelle River during a couple of weeks in June. The cherries that survive the initial harvest are saved in the form of preserves then used for cake filling. This cake is considered a regional specialty, and gâteau experts state that you must only use jam from this region when making it.

Within one family of the Basque diaspora community, this particular recipe has been handed down for generations, evoking memories of homeland through the simple act of eating a family meal. This recipe comes from Valerie Arrechea, president of the North American Basque Organizations, passed down from her husband’s great-aunt Jeanette Iribarren who brought it from Banka, in the Basque region of France.

Valerie will demonstrate how to make gâteau Basque at the 2016 Folklife Festival in the Ostatua Kitchen. Valerie Arrechea was kind enough to share her family recipe with those of us who have not had the opportunity to taste this fantastic Basque cake.

Cream Ingredients

Cake Ingredients

  • 2 whole eggs
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1 1/2 cup sugar
  • 3 1/3 cup flour
  • 1 cup unsalted butter (softened)
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • Flavoring of choice (2 tbs Pernod, 2 tbs rum)

Directions for the Cream

  1. In a medium bowl, combine the 2 egg yolks and 1/4 cup sugar. Beat until frothy. Add 3 tbs flour.
  2. In a saucepan, boil 1 1/4 cup milk and vanilla (to taste).
  3. Add a small amount of the milk and vanilla to the bowl of egg and sugar. This is so that the eggs do not cook too fast and curdle. Then add the mixture from the bowl to the saucepan.
  4. Bring back to a boil for a few minutes and whisk until it thickens.
  5. Take off the stove and put in a larger bowl to cool. Cover top with plastic wrap so that it doesn’t make a film.

Directions for the Cake

  1. In a medium bowl, mix together the sugar, two whole eggs, and one egg yolk.
  2. Add the softened butter, flour, and baking powder.
  3. Add flavoring of choice: Ricard, Pernod, rum, etc.
  4. If you have time, let it sit overnight in the refrigerator. This will allow you to roll out the dough. Roll out the bottom in a springform pan, pour in the cream, then roll out the top to cover.

  1. If you plan to cook it the same day, take small balls of the dough, cover with a little flour so it doesn’t stick, and pat into place in the pie pan. Cover bottom and sides of pan—it will come together when it cooks. Pour in cream. Pat out top layer.
  2. Wash top with egg yolk and add design if desired. This helps the dough come together and look uniform.
  3. Bake in 350 degree oven for 40 to 45 minutes.

Helpful Hints

  1. This dough has a lot of butter so it melts very quickly, especially when it is hot and humid. Work fast rolling the dough out when you take it out of the refrigerator, otherwise it will melt apart.
  2. When you add the custard to the middle of the cake, leave an inch of free space around the bottom of the cake so that the top crust can fuse with the bottom crust.
  3. When you are attaching the top and the bottom, you can use a little water as glue.

SarahVictoria Rosemann is the Folklife Festival media intern. She has a degree in ethnomusicology, with a focus in Tibetology, and grew up in Reno, Nevada.


Gâteau Basque: The Signature Basque Dessert

This relatively simple custard filled cake has a dedicated following within Basque communities. There is a Gâteau Basque Museum committed to demonstrating the technique of baking and a two-day Fête du Gâteau Basque in the adorable Basque village of Kanbo (Lapardi) in the southern part of France.

Traditionally filled with black cherry jam or a rum-flavored cream surrounded by a crunchy tart-like exterior, this gâteau sounds more similar to a pie than a cake. There is an easy trick to know which filling to expect: if there is a crosshatch pattern on the top, then the filling is cream, and if there is a Basque rounded cross (lauburu) then the filling is black cherry.

According to Mark Kurlansky, author of The Basque History of the World, gâteau Basque appears to date from the eighteenth century, may have originally been made with bread, and called bistochak.

Of the two fillings, cherry is the oldest, suggesting that the first gâteau Basque was a form of cherry bread.

To make a traditional gâteau Basque with the real black cherry jam, one must use xapata cherries which are only found in the valley of the Nivelle River during a couple of weeks in June. The cherries that survive the initial harvest are saved in the form of preserves then used for cake filling. This cake is considered a regional specialty, and gâteau experts state that you must only use jam from this region when making it.

Within one family of the Basque diaspora community, this particular recipe has been handed down for generations, evoking memories of homeland through the simple act of eating a family meal. This recipe comes from Valerie Arrechea, president of the North American Basque Organizations, passed down from her husband’s great-aunt Jeanette Iribarren who brought it from Banka, in the Basque region of France.

Valerie will demonstrate how to make gâteau Basque at the 2016 Folklife Festival in the Ostatua Kitchen. Valerie Arrechea was kind enough to share her family recipe with those of us who have not had the opportunity to taste this fantastic Basque cake.

Cream Ingredients

Cake Ingredients

  • 2 whole eggs
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1 1/2 cup sugar
  • 3 1/3 cup flour
  • 1 cup unsalted butter (softened)
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • Flavoring of choice (2 tbs Pernod, 2 tbs rum)

Directions for the Cream

  1. In a medium bowl, combine the 2 egg yolks and 1/4 cup sugar. Beat until frothy. Add 3 tbs flour.
  2. In a saucepan, boil 1 1/4 cup milk and vanilla (to taste).
  3. Add a small amount of the milk and vanilla to the bowl of egg and sugar. This is so that the eggs do not cook too fast and curdle. Then add the mixture from the bowl to the saucepan.
  4. Bring back to a boil for a few minutes and whisk until it thickens.
  5. Take off the stove and put in a larger bowl to cool. Cover top with plastic wrap so that it doesn’t make a film.

Directions for the Cake

  1. In a medium bowl, mix together the sugar, two whole eggs, and one egg yolk.
  2. Add the softened butter, flour, and baking powder.
  3. Add flavoring of choice: Ricard, Pernod, rum, etc.
  4. If you have time, let it sit overnight in the refrigerator. This will allow you to roll out the dough. Roll out the bottom in a springform pan, pour in the cream, then roll out the top to cover.

  1. If you plan to cook it the same day, take small balls of the dough, cover with a little flour so it doesn’t stick, and pat into place in the pie pan. Cover bottom and sides of pan—it will come together when it cooks. Pour in cream. Pat out top layer.
  2. Wash top with egg yolk and add design if desired. This helps the dough come together and look uniform.
  3. Bake in 350 degree oven for 40 to 45 minutes.

Helpful Hints

  1. This dough has a lot of butter so it melts very quickly, especially when it is hot and humid. Work fast rolling the dough out when you take it out of the refrigerator, otherwise it will melt apart.
  2. When you add the custard to the middle of the cake, leave an inch of free space around the bottom of the cake so that the top crust can fuse with the bottom crust.
  3. When you are attaching the top and the bottom, you can use a little water as glue.

SarahVictoria Rosemann is the Folklife Festival media intern. She has a degree in ethnomusicology, with a focus in Tibetology, and grew up in Reno, Nevada.


Gâteau Basque: The Signature Basque Dessert

This relatively simple custard filled cake has a dedicated following within Basque communities. There is a Gâteau Basque Museum committed to demonstrating the technique of baking and a two-day Fête du Gâteau Basque in the adorable Basque village of Kanbo (Lapardi) in the southern part of France.

Traditionally filled with black cherry jam or a rum-flavored cream surrounded by a crunchy tart-like exterior, this gâteau sounds more similar to a pie than a cake. There is an easy trick to know which filling to expect: if there is a crosshatch pattern on the top, then the filling is cream, and if there is a Basque rounded cross (lauburu) then the filling is black cherry.

According to Mark Kurlansky, author of The Basque History of the World, gâteau Basque appears to date from the eighteenth century, may have originally been made with bread, and called bistochak.

Of the two fillings, cherry is the oldest, suggesting that the first gâteau Basque was a form of cherry bread.

To make a traditional gâteau Basque with the real black cherry jam, one must use xapata cherries which are only found in the valley of the Nivelle River during a couple of weeks in June. The cherries that survive the initial harvest are saved in the form of preserves then used for cake filling. This cake is considered a regional specialty, and gâteau experts state that you must only use jam from this region when making it.

Within one family of the Basque diaspora community, this particular recipe has been handed down for generations, evoking memories of homeland through the simple act of eating a family meal. This recipe comes from Valerie Arrechea, president of the North American Basque Organizations, passed down from her husband’s great-aunt Jeanette Iribarren who brought it from Banka, in the Basque region of France.

Valerie will demonstrate how to make gâteau Basque at the 2016 Folklife Festival in the Ostatua Kitchen. Valerie Arrechea was kind enough to share her family recipe with those of us who have not had the opportunity to taste this fantastic Basque cake.

Cream Ingredients

Cake Ingredients

  • 2 whole eggs
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1 1/2 cup sugar
  • 3 1/3 cup flour
  • 1 cup unsalted butter (softened)
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • Flavoring of choice (2 tbs Pernod, 2 tbs rum)

Directions for the Cream

  1. In a medium bowl, combine the 2 egg yolks and 1/4 cup sugar. Beat until frothy. Add 3 tbs flour.
  2. In a saucepan, boil 1 1/4 cup milk and vanilla (to taste).
  3. Add a small amount of the milk and vanilla to the bowl of egg and sugar. This is so that the eggs do not cook too fast and curdle. Then add the mixture from the bowl to the saucepan.
  4. Bring back to a boil for a few minutes and whisk until it thickens.
  5. Take off the stove and put in a larger bowl to cool. Cover top with plastic wrap so that it doesn’t make a film.

Directions for the Cake

  1. In a medium bowl, mix together the sugar, two whole eggs, and one egg yolk.
  2. Add the softened butter, flour, and baking powder.
  3. Add flavoring of choice: Ricard, Pernod, rum, etc.
  4. If you have time, let it sit overnight in the refrigerator. This will allow you to roll out the dough. Roll out the bottom in a springform pan, pour in the cream, then roll out the top to cover.

  1. If you plan to cook it the same day, take small balls of the dough, cover with a little flour so it doesn’t stick, and pat into place in the pie pan. Cover bottom and sides of pan—it will come together when it cooks. Pour in cream. Pat out top layer.
  2. Wash top with egg yolk and add design if desired. This helps the dough come together and look uniform.
  3. Bake in 350 degree oven for 40 to 45 minutes.

Helpful Hints

  1. This dough has a lot of butter so it melts very quickly, especially when it is hot and humid. Work fast rolling the dough out when you take it out of the refrigerator, otherwise it will melt apart.
  2. When you add the custard to the middle of the cake, leave an inch of free space around the bottom of the cake so that the top crust can fuse with the bottom crust.
  3. When you are attaching the top and the bottom, you can use a little water as glue.

SarahVictoria Rosemann is the Folklife Festival media intern. She has a degree in ethnomusicology, with a focus in Tibetology, and grew up in Reno, Nevada.


Gâteau Basque: The Signature Basque Dessert

This relatively simple custard filled cake has a dedicated following within Basque communities. There is a Gâteau Basque Museum committed to demonstrating the technique of baking and a two-day Fête du Gâteau Basque in the adorable Basque village of Kanbo (Lapardi) in the southern part of France.

Traditionally filled with black cherry jam or a rum-flavored cream surrounded by a crunchy tart-like exterior, this gâteau sounds more similar to a pie than a cake. There is an easy trick to know which filling to expect: if there is a crosshatch pattern on the top, then the filling is cream, and if there is a Basque rounded cross (lauburu) then the filling is black cherry.

According to Mark Kurlansky, author of The Basque History of the World, gâteau Basque appears to date from the eighteenth century, may have originally been made with bread, and called bistochak.

Of the two fillings, cherry is the oldest, suggesting that the first gâteau Basque was a form of cherry bread.

To make a traditional gâteau Basque with the real black cherry jam, one must use xapata cherries which are only found in the valley of the Nivelle River during a couple of weeks in June. The cherries that survive the initial harvest are saved in the form of preserves then used for cake filling. This cake is considered a regional specialty, and gâteau experts state that you must only use jam from this region when making it.

Within one family of the Basque diaspora community, this particular recipe has been handed down for generations, evoking memories of homeland through the simple act of eating a family meal. This recipe comes from Valerie Arrechea, president of the North American Basque Organizations, passed down from her husband’s great-aunt Jeanette Iribarren who brought it from Banka, in the Basque region of France.

Valerie will demonstrate how to make gâteau Basque at the 2016 Folklife Festival in the Ostatua Kitchen. Valerie Arrechea was kind enough to share her family recipe with those of us who have not had the opportunity to taste this fantastic Basque cake.

Cream Ingredients

Cake Ingredients

  • 2 whole eggs
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1 1/2 cup sugar
  • 3 1/3 cup flour
  • 1 cup unsalted butter (softened)
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • Flavoring of choice (2 tbs Pernod, 2 tbs rum)

Directions for the Cream

  1. In a medium bowl, combine the 2 egg yolks and 1/4 cup sugar. Beat until frothy. Add 3 tbs flour.
  2. In a saucepan, boil 1 1/4 cup milk and vanilla (to taste).
  3. Add a small amount of the milk and vanilla to the bowl of egg and sugar. This is so that the eggs do not cook too fast and curdle. Then add the mixture from the bowl to the saucepan.
  4. Bring back to a boil for a few minutes and whisk until it thickens.
  5. Take off the stove and put in a larger bowl to cool. Cover top with plastic wrap so that it doesn’t make a film.

Directions for the Cake

  1. In a medium bowl, mix together the sugar, two whole eggs, and one egg yolk.
  2. Add the softened butter, flour, and baking powder.
  3. Add flavoring of choice: Ricard, Pernod, rum, etc.
  4. If you have time, let it sit overnight in the refrigerator. This will allow you to roll out the dough. Roll out the bottom in a springform pan, pour in the cream, then roll out the top to cover.

  1. If you plan to cook it the same day, take small balls of the dough, cover with a little flour so it doesn’t stick, and pat into place in the pie pan. Cover bottom and sides of pan—it will come together when it cooks. Pour in cream. Pat out top layer.
  2. Wash top with egg yolk and add design if desired. This helps the dough come together and look uniform.
  3. Bake in 350 degree oven for 40 to 45 minutes.

Helpful Hints

  1. This dough has a lot of butter so it melts very quickly, especially when it is hot and humid. Work fast rolling the dough out when you take it out of the refrigerator, otherwise it will melt apart.
  2. When you add the custard to the middle of the cake, leave an inch of free space around the bottom of the cake so that the top crust can fuse with the bottom crust.
  3. When you are attaching the top and the bottom, you can use a little water as glue.

SarahVictoria Rosemann is the Folklife Festival media intern. She has a degree in ethnomusicology, with a focus in Tibetology, and grew up in Reno, Nevada.


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