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Mexican Hot Chocolate

Mexican Hot Chocolate

Instead of vanilla extract for this Mexican hot chocolate recipe, try almond extract if you’ve got it handy, which adds even more depth of flavor.

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons crushed cinnamon sticks (preferably Ceylon)
  • 6 ounces semisweet chocolate (preferably Scharffen Berger), finely chopped
  • 3 tablespoons demerara or granulated sugar
  • ¾ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • ¼ teaspoon ground chile de árbol or cayenne pepper, plus more for serving
  • Lightly sweetened whipped cream (for serving)

Recipe Preparation

  • Bring milk and cinnamon to a simmer in a medium saucepan over medium-low heat, whisking occasionally and making sure milk doesn’t boil, until cinnamon is floral and fragrant, about 10 minutes. Whisk in chocolate, sugar, vanilla, salt, and ¼ tsp. ground chile and cook, whisking frequently, until mixture is smooth and creamy and chocolate is melted, about 5 minutes.

  • Divide hot chocolate among mugs. Top with whipped cream and dust with cocoa powder.

Reviews Section

When the weather gets chilly, there is no better drink to warm you up than traditional Mexican hot chocolate frothed by hand with a wooden molinillo. It’s sooo… good!

Choosing Chocolate

The best chocolate comes from the state of Oaxaca which is what we used for this recipe. The city of Zacatecas produces a very good chocolate de metate, or stone ground chocolate. Chocolate is sold in bars called tablillas (tablets). It is sweetened with sugar and spiced with cinnamon. Mexican chocolate has a slightly grainy rustic texture which isn’t completely smooth in the cup. Don’t consider that a negative. That’s how it’s supposed to be. The texture is an integral part of the drink.

Where to Buy

You can find Mexican chocolate at most supermarkets. The two easiest to find brands are”Abuelita” by Nestlé and Ibarra. If you can’t find it at your local supermarket, you can order artisanal chocolate from Oaxaca through HERNÁN, specialists in premium Mexican food and kitchenware. (BUY)

Disclosure: Some of the links are affiliate links, meaning, at no additional cost to you, we will earn a small commission if you click through and purchase a product. We only recommend authentic products that we use ourselves and love.

How to Use a Molinillo

Molinillos (mo-lee-nee-yos)are the traditional way to froth your hot chocolate. Think of molinillo as a wooden whisk. It’s a beautiful addition to your Mexican kitchen. A regular wire whisk is a good substitute. If you would like to try using a molinillo you can also get them from HERNÁN. (BUY)

Enjoy!

Serve with a pastry and garnish each cup with a cinnamon stick and top with marshmallows if you like. Mmmm…


Mexican Hot Chocolate

There are commercial brands of Mexican hot chocolate, and they were fine until I had chocolate from Oaxaca and then later, Guerrero. What a difference something made by hand makes. I met our producer, Araceli, and fell in love with her and her product. She hand toasts the cacao on a wood-fired clay comal and then grinds it with just piloncillo (evaporated cane juice) and canela (soft cinnamon). The result is rich, smoky and 70 percent chocolate (whereas I would guess the commercial brands are about 70 percent sugar.)

The best technique is to use scalded milk and then add the chocolate and whip with a wooden molinillo. You can find this handy tool in any Mexican grocery store, and kids love to help out and make their own drinks.

  • 1 cup whole milk or almond milk
  • 1/2 tablet Rancho Gordo Stoneground Mexican Chocolate, broken into pieces
  1. In a deep pan, gently bring the milk to a boil over medium heat. (I’ve been told the best hot chocolate is made from milk that has been allowed to boil three times.)
  2. Pour the hot milk into the jar of a blender and add the chocolate, making sure not to go above the jar’s hot liquid mark. Blend until smooth and pour into a mug.

(The lovely woman in the photo is Araceli and she heads the women's cooperative that makes our chocolate.)


Mexican Hot Chocolate

In a medium-small (2 quart) saucepan, combine the milk or water and chocolate. Stir over medium heat until the mixture is steaming hot, and the chocolate more or less dissolved (there will still be small pieces). Pour into a Mexican chocolate pot (olla para chocolate) or a blender.

If using the Mexican pot, put a wooden molinillo in the pot and begin whipping the chocolate by rolling the handle quickly back and forth between your palms. The movement is a little like rubbing your palms against each other to warm them in cold weather—only here the molinillo’s wooden handle is between them. After about 2 minutes of vigorous beating, dip a spoon into the mixture to make sure the chocolate has dissolved (they’ll always be a few bits of chocolate on the bottom) and the mixture is foamy.

If using a blender, loosely cover (or take off the lid’s removable center piece—this eliminates dangerous pressure build-up when blending hot mixtures) and blend until the mixture is homogenous and foamy, about 30 seconds. Alternatively, use an immersion blender in a tall pitcher and blend until foamy.

Pour into cups, dividing the foam equally, and they’re ready to serve.

Working Ahead: Frothy Mexican hot chocolate waits for no one.


Mexican Hot Chocolate

This is not the first of my Mexican hot chocolates, but I feel it will be my last. You can melt chunks of chocolate (as I have in previous versions) into hot milk, but I love the particular richness and thickness you get from good Continental hot chocolate powders. Plus, I add Kahlua, so there is really no need to consider anything else.

The whipped cream on top is not essential unless you decide to serve this in lieu of pudding - and - coffee, which I can't help thinking is a very, very good idea indeed.

Aerosol cream, which gives that glorious whipped cream effect is, alas, always longlife, but if you're brave enough, buy a nutritious cream whipper and learn to spurt and squirt the fresh cream at will.

For US cup measures, use the toggle at the top of the ingredients list.

This is not the first of my Mexican hot chocolates, but I feel it will be my last. You can melt chunks of chocolate (as I have in previous versions) into hot milk, but I love the particular richness and thickness you get from good Continental hot chocolate powders. Plus, I add Kahlua, so there is really no need to consider anything else.

The whipped cream on top is not essential unless you decide to serve this in lieu of pudding - and - coffee, which I can't help thinking is a very, very good idea indeed.

Aerosol cream, which gives that glorious whipped cream effect is, alas, always longlife, but if you're brave enough, buy a nutritious cream whipper and learn to spurt and squirt the fresh cream at will.


Mexican Hot Chocolate

Adapted from Fany Gerson | My Sweet Mexico | Ten Speed Press, 2010

Swoon to the movie “Like Water for Chocolate”? We do. For many reasons, among them the fact that the title draws, word for word, on an ageless and really quite apt Mexican saying. See, when someone is said to be “like water for chocolate,” they’re at the point of boiling over with emotion. Makes perfect sense when you consider that in Mexico, where hot chocolate is made the proper way and not from pathetic little envelopes, water must be sufficiently caliente in order to melt the discs of slowly toasted, hand-ground cacao, sugar, and aromatics into something to sip. This old-fashioned approach results in the “wonderfully frothy hot chocolate from Oaxaca” that Fany Gerson speaks of in her book, My Sweet Mexico, and captures in the recipe below.

Said chocolate discs—or tablets, as Gerson says—exist in a vast array of styles. Plain. Infused with chiles. Spiced. Nutty. With a lilt of vanilla. And, um, other intriguing things. They can also be a little tricky to find. If you want Mexican hot chocolate that’s truly made from scratch, consider making your own chocolate tablets as Gerson instructs in her lovely, lavish book. If that’s a little beyond your desired commitment, seek out Mexican chocolate discs at specialty stores, online, or, natch, in Mexico.–Renee Schettler Rossi

LC Holy Moli-What? Note

Mexican hot chocolate is traditionally energetically beaten with a molinillo and, according to Gerson, poured from up high so the not-too-sweet sipper is foamy. She says it’s okay to use a whisk if you don’t have a wooden tool that’s turned with the palms of your hands to froth the hot chocolate. But for best results, just make sure the chocolate is really frothy and really hot before you drink it.


Recipe Summary

  • 2 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 2 teaspoons cream of tartar
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon coarse salt
  • 1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 1 3/4 cups sugar
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon chile powder (optional)

Preheat oven to 400 degrees, with racks in upper and lower thirds. In a medium bowl, sift together flour, cocoa powder, cream of tartar, baking soda, and salt. In a large bowl, using an electric mixer, beat butter and 1 1/2 cups sugar on medium speed until light and fluffy, about 2 minutes. Scrape down side of bowl. Add eggs and beat to combine. With mixer on low, gradually add flour mixture and beat until combined.

In a small bowl, combine remaining 1/4 cup sugar, cinnamon, and chile powder (if using). Using heaping tablespoons, form balls of dough and roll in cinnamon-sugar mixture. Place, about 3 inches apart, on two parchment-lined baking sheets. Bake until cookies are set in center and begin to crack, about 10 minutes, rotating sheets halfway through. Let cookies cool on sheets on wire racks 5 minutes, then transfer cookies to racks to cool completely. (Store in an airtight container, up to 1 week.)


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Watch the video: Τέλεια ζεστή σοκολάτα σε 5 λεπτά. Τάσος Αντωνίου (October 2021).